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"You wasted $150,000 on an education you coulda got for a buck fifty in late charges at the public library." Will Hunting knew what he was talking about.

Not everyone has the time, desire or a small fortune to to get an MBA. But for a fraction of the price, you can get a business education by tapping into successful entrepreneurs and professors' knowledge.

Here are four of the best books to read on navigating the business world and starting your own company.

1. The Portable MBA

For those interested in an MBA but not sure.

The Portable MBA, written by University of Virginia's Darden School of Business professors, covers core business school topics. If you need a bird's eye view of a MBA program or just need a crash course in the basics of business, chapters cover everything from finance, accounting, marketing, economics to ethics, leadership and strategy. An easier read than some MBA books, this is a great place to start if you are interested in business or an MBA.

2. The Four Steps to the Epiphany: Successful Strategies for Products that Win

For those looking at starting a business.

The core of Four Steps to the Epiphany is the base for the Lean Start Up method. Silicon Valley entrepreneur and Stanford professor Steve Blank argues that startups should focus on customer development rather than solely product development. Blank points to several traps that companies fall into causing them to fail. The customer-centric theory is a key point in successfully selling an idea before spending on marketing or scaling. This book is filled with examples, charts and illustrations to show how to turn a startup in to a company.

3. The Personal MBA

For those interested the basics of business.

This is a more in-depth look into business practices, which translates well into real-world application. Broad business concepts like starting a new business and actually running a business are major themes. Learn to evaluate a market, different forms of value, the Iron Law of the market, pricing uncertainty principle and ways to increase revenue. For an added bonus, visit author Josh Kaufman's website for a list of 100 of the best business books and his TEDX talk on the first 20 Hours of an MBA.

4. Bootstrapping

For those starting a business with limited funds.

When your company is not blessed with unlimited funds or an angel investor, bootstrapping is essential to getting started. Bootstrapping or starting a business without external venture capital requires creatively using internal cash flow. Entrepreneurial Mind CEO and co-founder Jeff Cornwall explores thriving on a limited budget through various techniques. The book teaches strict control of finances as well as process efficiency, cash-flow-management, human resources and long-term bootstrapping.

Four More Recommended Reads:

The Lean Start Up by Eric Ries (A student of Steve Blank)

How to Read a Financial Report by John A. Tracy

Getting Things Done by David Allen

Financial Intelligence for Entrepreneurs by Karen Berman and Joe Knight

The idea of investing can seem terribly haphazard, especially if you've just finished watching Wolf of Wall Street. What are you going to do with your money? Invest it? Is a money market better? Or what about bonds? But do you know what are you're doing? No? You should start reading then. Even if you chose to have broker do your investing for you, staying up to date with the latest information helps make better long-term financial decisions.

Here are six websites you should be reading, subscribing to or studying.

1. Investopidea

If you have questions relating to money and finance, then Investopedia is where you turn. An easy to understand dictionary, guides, calculators and stock stimulator can help students and investors alike. If you're not ready to dive into the investing world, there's the Stock Market game, which can give you a practice run and compare how you do with investors without losing money.

2. Seeking Alpha

One of the more extensive websites, Seeking Alpha provides crowd sourced investing information on over 8,00 tickers. Stock analysts, traders, economists and industry experts create the content and editors curate. Since a community creates Seeking Alpha Investing content, advice is typically from the buy-side of the market.

3. SEC EDGAR

If a company is public, than the SEC has a slew of information on the company that's beneficial for investors. The company's prospectus provides background information on business operations, history, financial conditions and risk assessment— all of which has been audited by a CPA. The 10-K and 10 Q are annual and quarterly financial reports. You can also learn about owner(s) information, any ownership changes, criminal behavior and any legal scuffles. Plus, the SEC kindly provides red flags in the footnotes of company filings.

4. Yahoo Finance

Yahoo Finance offers real time information on stock quotes along with financial reports, aggregated content and original content. The good stuff is the SEC filings, analysts' estimates for quarters, and ownership data. Plus, you can easily create and save screeners to filter and track stocks based on your investing preferences. Another valuable tool is the "My Portfolio" tool, which can serve as your home base with real-time stock performance and news.

5. Bloomberg

Bloomberg's websitse, newsletters, magazines, live stream TV and radio offer comprehensive economic, business and stock market news and data. Started by former Salomon Brothers partner Michael Bloomberg, the company began as terminal computer system for Wall Street Firms. Basically, it's made by serious investors for serious investors. If you're trading in foreign markets, Bloomberg's around the clock and around the world stock coverage is a serious asset. Even if you don't have an extra two grand for subscription fees, there is plenty of free valuable content.

6. Bank Rate

If you're a what if's person, than Bank Rate will make your heart pitter patter. Use Bank Rate to calculate and compare rates for bonds and CDs. Or use the Investment Calculator to see if your investments are on track to match your goals.

When most of our parents were in their 20s, they were having us, buying houses, and working on their 401ks. Flash-forward a generation and now the 20s are considered a development phase. Even if you are figuring out what you're doing with your life, avoiding financial pitfalls can get you where you want to be much faster.

From managing your spending to paying all of your bills, here are the eight financial habits you need to form in your 20s.

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