resume

As labor market demands continue changing, redesigned job skills are working their way to the top of employers' desired skill sets for employees.

With nearly 14 million Americans currently looking for work, giving your resume an update has never sounded better! We have cultivated a list of the most coveted and in-demand job skills you should focus on developing as you prepare for a changing COVID influenced world.

Employers look for employees who possess both hard and soft skills. Hard skills are those that involve technical knowledge, while soft skills deal with personality traits.

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Chances are up to know you've only interviewed for service or retail industry jobs that you've gotten right on the spot. Or your mom used some pretty sketchy nepotism to secure you that receptionist gig one summer — shhh, no one has to know.

But now it's onto the real world — making connections, interviewing well and making sure you're decently presentable are all new things you'll need to consider. Getting those crucial internships or fellowships will help you secure a much coveted spot in your industry

Mommy and daddy aren't going to hold your hand forever so you'll need some help to get going — here are seven interviewing tips to aid you and your peers.

1. Cater your resume to each job description

This probably sounds super tedious but if you can write a personalized cover letter for each job, you can alter your resume a bit too. Pay attention to specific skills, qualities and experience highlighted within the job description and make sure these appear first on your resume. And if you've cut out some related experience to shorten your resume, consider swapping them in for something that might not be as essential.

2. Prepare personal examples or anecdotes of key assets

If a job description emphasises leadership and teamwork, be ready to list a couple of personal examples that showcase these traits. Tell your interviewer about that one time you took charge on a group project or how you're so organized you keep two agendas — something related and quirky will definitely obtain and keep attention.

3. Show dedication and interest

If you're not enthusiastic about the job, why would they hire you? Even if you just need to pay the rent this summer, you can't let them know that's the only thing that motivates you. Pay attention to the goals and issues of the company and relate them to your own goals — this way, your interviewer will know you're going to put your 100% in.

4. Use appropriate body language

There's nothing I hate more than a weak handshake — it's like gripping a limp chicken that also has a weak personality and shows hesitancy. Your other body language will tell stories, too — slouching in your seat gives off unprofessionalism and not making eye contact will make you seem doubtful and unconfident. Be firm and strong minded in your actions — it'll definitely reflect a more secure and stable identity.

5. Prepare your own questions

At the end of every interview, they'll definitely ask you if you have any questions for them or the company. Even if you don't — ask. Take away something you heard from the interview or something you read online and form an intelligent question — it'll show that you were paying attention and expressing concern for the position.

6. Write thank you notes

Email a thank you note as soon as you get home or finish the interview — not only will they have a physical reminder of the interview, but it's also just common courtesy. Be sure to include any notable information from the interview and summarize again why you'd be a good match for this job.

Plus, you'll have another line of communication with them in case you have any follow up questions.

7. Practice makes perfect

It might seem silly to roleplay an interview, but you'll definitely be more comfortable once you do. Utilize your college's career services and set up a mock interview with an advisor or even just grab a friend. Google some common interview questions to answer and you should be all set.

So there you go — these tips will definitely not steer you wrong, but there are definitely many more things you can do to ensure the job. Practice and experience really does make perfect so the best thing to do is to dive right in.

entrepreneur.com

We are always being told what to include on our resume, but there are things we ought to leave off as well. More is sometimes just more - not necessarily useful, and some items can be exhibited more clearly and concisely, as well as projected more professionally.

As per The Balance, "Recruiters can take as little as thirty seconds to conduct an initial review of your resume. You should avoid cluttering your document with unnecessary information which might make it harder for the employer to find the most qualifying elements of your background."

Redo your resume by letting go of fillers and wording that doesn't represent the best version of yourself and your accomplishments. Potential employers will be impressed with you before they even meet you in person!

thriverecruits.com

An Objective

Many resumes start off with an objective, which usually consists of a generalized statement that nearly anyone would agree is sensible, but not specific. "I'm seeking to grow with your company," or "I will use my education and experience to excel at a new position," are not particularly useful or give any indication of how you'll add value to the business.

The Muse suggests an alternative. "Craft an executive summary or 'Who I Am' section that showcases your overarching value proposition and speaks directly to the stuff you know the target audience is going to care the most about. This is your chance to make it clear you're a strong fit."

This summary of qualifications, "encompasses your skills, abilities, professional expertise, and what makes you most suitable for the position," as per The Balance.

"Big" Words

Stick to the facts of what you have done thus far using simple and straightforward language that gets the point across clearly. Now is not the time to show off your broad vocabulary or former spelling bee champ internal word database. All this will do is become a distraction, making your resume harder to read, not to mention, borderline obnoxious.

According to The Muse, "Using non-conversational words doesn't make you look smart; it makes you look like someone who spends too much time in a thesaurus."

Let your background speak for itself. If you need to adorn your experiences with "bells and whistles," perhaps you need to rework how you layout your past responsibilities, so they reflect your work ethic and valuable skills and experience.

Insignificant Jobs

Depending upon how long you have been in the workforce, there may not be a need to list every job you've ever had. If you are applying for a senior-level position, those two months of scooping ice cream the summer after college aren't going to sweeten the deal.

According to U.S. News & World Report, "Short-term jobs raise red flags for hiring managers, who will wonder if you were fired, couldn't do the work, or had trouble getting along with co-workers. Plus, a few months on a job won't typically be useful in showing any real accomplishments or advancement anyway."

The Muse adds, "Unless something you did more than 12-15 years ago is vital for your target audience to know about, you don't need to list the entry-level job or internship you held in 1994. It's totally OK to leave some of the life history off."

Personal Info

While a resume is all about you, it must be related to work experience specifically. This is not your mini-autobiography. Not only can adding non-professional info be "TMI," but it may make your resume super-long and difficult to peruse.

For instance, as Inc. suggests, "Don't list hobbies on your resume--save these for interview conversation. And any awards you list should be from community service or previous work." Even more importantly, "Don't include things like date of birth, ethnicity, religious affiliations (unless the job you're going for is somehow related), reasons for leaving your previous job, specific street addresses, or phone numbers of previous employers."

Additionally, "Unless you're applying for a job as a model or actor, photos of yourself have no place on your resume. Since your appearance has nothing to do with your ability to do the job, including a photo comes across as naive and unprofessional," notes U.S. News & World Report. The interviewer will have plenty of time to see your face if you are asked to meet in person.

Silly/Unprofessional Email Address

If you still have that same email account from high school or college made up from a nickname or something silly, stupid, or scandalous, now's the time to get a brand new professional email address. Start things off on the right foot without embarrassment or being passed over altogether.

As Inc. recommends, "gnarlydude56@yahoo.com," may have been fun to use at one point in your life, but in the professional world, it's a miss.

And perhaps an even worse idea is to use an email address from your current place of employment, as noted by The Muse. "Nothing says, 'I job search on company time' quite like using your current work email address on a resume. Unless you own the company, it's poor form to run your job search through your company's email system."

If you still think your resume can use some fine-tuning and refreshing, let TopResume take care of your resume for you. Get a free expert review, career advice, or have them rewrite your resume for you. TopResume guarantees they will get you two times more job interviews within 60 days by signing up with one of their resume packages.

Revamp that resume and get the job you're seeking. Good luck!

entrepreneur.com