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Going to work every day to face an unpleasant or unjustifiably harsh boss or coworker can make even a job you love distressing. There's often no clear or simple way out of a situation like this, but with some helpful tips you'll be able to face the problem with confidence and move steadily toward a solution. Learn how to handle a tough boss or coworker and begin to like your job again.

Dealing with a Difficult Boss

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The first step towards a solution is to examine your boss's perspective. Put yourself in their position and see if you can feel the reasons they behave the way they do. It's extremely difficult to do this if you feel like the victim of unfair treatment, but it might help you find the best path toward fixing the problem.

If your boss stresses you out daily about each small task, confronting them about the habit probably won't stop their micromanaging. The best defense against this behavior might simply be to accomplish the tasks you know they'll expect you to do before they ask. Consistent self-management is a good way to demonstrate that you don't need constant supervision from others.

Every solution begins with communication. This doesn't mean directly addressing the problem every time you talk to your boss. Instead, it means nurturing the relationship between worker and manager and hoping that this naturally calms the tension and more closely aligns the goals and expectations of both parties.

If there's simply no way forward and your life at work and at home is suffering because of the stress, it might be necessary to try to transfer to a different team, department, branch or—if the situation is irreparable—company.

Handling a Difficult Coworker

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Workplace relationships between coworkers are even more important than those with bosses. Unfortunately, not every situation is ideal. You might have trouble focusing on your work when you're surrounded by talkative, distracting partners. Or, you might feel like you can't break through with a coworker to form a real friendship.

Dealing with negative effects on your work is difficult and delicate. Like handling a tough boss, addressing problems with a coworker starts with consideration and communication. Standing in their shoes, can you see a reason for their actions? Is there anything you can do to help them that would stem the cause of the problems? Is the situation mild enough that meeting about it and discussing your feelings with the other person would help?

If a coworker's negativity is bringing you down, it's probably best to spend time in another circle of employees or another area of the building. If an employee is overly competitive and uses rudeness or insults to hamper your work, it's important to keep the focus of meetings and presentations on the success of the company and away from personal success. Their selfishness will stand out unattractively next to your teamwork.

A serious problem at work is a colleague who bullies. This is an issue that requires courage and patience to address. Always stand up for yourself but don't fall for bait or lose your temper: calmness and firmness on your part will win this confrontation. However, there are many, many battles in the long war against bullies and constantly spending energy on it will take away from your work. At this point, it's best to take the problem calmly to a superior. HR departments and administrators are trained to deal with this type of problem, so don't be afraid to ask for their help. After all, your happiness at work will only benefit the team and the whole company.

Working in a healthy environment sometimes means having difficult conversations about difficult relationships with bosses and coworkers. These moments are important because you worked hard to earn the position you have and you don't deserve to have it ruined by rude or inconsiderate people. Plus, mending these relationships could make the job even better in the future. Have confidence, use your patience, and act firmly to make your workplace a comfortable, productive space that you'll enjoy going to every day.

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While many teens and young adults are doing the usual thing - be it going to school or embarking on internships and first jobs - there are some young people out there with an entrepreneurial spirit that just can't wait to flourish.

When an inventive idea sets in, go-getters like Hart Main and Caroline Pugh are ready to leap into action, using their youthful passion, energy, and intelligence to create new things and make a difference. Read on to learn more about the impressive two and what they have already accomplished in their young lives. Success from an early start makes these two entrepreneurs enlightening examples for the young and old alike.

Hart Main: ManCans

Via indeonline.com

When it comes to getting a jumpstart on success, Hart Main is one to follow. At the tender age of 13, Main had a mission, to create candles which featured "manly scents," along with a line catered to female candle fans as well (which came further down the road). ManCans, which are candles inside soup cans are unique and fun.

As per Times Reporter, "ManCans candles have gone from being made in Main's kitchen and sold to family and friends, to being made at Beaver Creek Candle Co. and sold in nearly 150 stores across the United States. ManCans also has donated thousands of dollars to soup kitchens."

With unexpected scents like New York Style Pizza, Fresh Cut Grass, Burnt Rubber, Bacon, and Cigar, these candles are unlike what we're used to seeing (and smelling). Each one sells for a reasonable $10, making them as affordable as they are aromatic.

Still under 20-years-old now, Main aspires to inspire other young budding entrepreneurs with his book, co-written with his father Craig, One Candle, One Meal. "Hart's story will show you that you're never too young to make a difference."

From a flicker of an idea to a raging success, Main and his ManCans are lighting the path for new brilliant inventions to come.

Caroline Pugh: VirtualU

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Fitness-minded with a flair for technology, the now mid-20s Caroline Pugh is co-founder and COO of VirtualU, which as explained by Forbes, "Integrates 3D human modeling technology with fitness and healthcare space so that people can accurately track how their body changes as they work out."

As described by the company, "The VFit™ 3D body scanner is the first sub-$10K device with millimeter precision, capable of producing highly realistic 3D models in just 20 seconds. Our current solution allows fitness gym members to scan their bodies and track body fat, lean muscle mass, and circumferences of the neck, biceps, chest, waist, thigh, and calf."

Pugh developed the idea while she was a sophomore at Virginia Tech. According to Huffington Post, "She led a team of 13 and raised $1.8 million in capital." Along with her studies, she had a passion for invention that propelled her to create and innovate. And as per Forbes, "She was awarded the CIT Gap 50 Award as most likely to build Virginia's next generation life science, technology, and energy companies." Pugh apparently was not the only one who knew she was on to something.

What is Pugh up to these days? Huffington Post reports, "She is the Chief of Staff to Aneesh Chopra, who is the first Chief Technology Officer to the United States. At Mr. Chopra's firm called NavHealth, Caroline works to make health systems nationwide more intelligent. Using data analytics and research insights, NavHealth ensures that patients have access to vital knowledge so that they can make informed decisions regarding their health."

Making her mark in the world of technology entrepreneurship, Pugh is a shining example of talent, perseverance, and success. And even though she has already done so much thus far, it's only just the beginning.

Stay tuned for more inspiring entrepreneurs and their success stories.

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Is your boss a big pain in the "you know what?" Are they always on your case, breathing down your neck, questioning your every decision, and giving you a hard time, even though you believe you are doing a good job?

Before you let your frustration and anger get the best of you, there may just be a bright side to your boss' bossy ways. A "pushy" boss can be the best kind. Once you realize that their behavior towards you isn't personal, you'll find that they are on your side, looking out for what's best for the business, and truly doing their job well. "Tough as nails" may be painful at first, but once you learn the positives, you'll come to realize that having a tough boss is an asset. Here's why…

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Bosses are like a box of chocolate, you never know which one you're gonna get. Some bosses are like a dream come true – caring, intelligent, morale-boosting, confident, and many other positive attributes we appreciate and hope for in a leader. Others, on the flip side, can be disrespectful, arrogant, unfair, uncompassionate, and even downright mean. All the personality traits that make a boss a pain in the you-know-what.

If you have a boss you simply can't tolerate or want to prepare for the chance that you may one day be burdened with one, here are 3 ways to deal with a boss you can't stand. It's all about how you handle things to make your work life satisfactory.

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