We all work for a variety of motivators. Success, personal growth, status, fame, and for a good portion of us, fortune. Or at least a salary that's acceptable to us. There will come a time, or a multitude of times throughout our careers when we'll desire more money. We could seek a job that pays more than what we're doing currently, or ask for more money from our current employer.

Asking for a raise can be daunting. Actually getting one can be a challenge. Neither has to be. With these 3 steps you can take to help you ask and receive the raise you feel you deserve, your confidence and commitment will shine through and your employer will feel good about adding some more moolah to your paycheck.

Before you burst into your boss's office, take time to get raise-ready with the steps below. It's as easy as 1, 2, 3!

Timing Is Key

Just because you're ready to ask for a raise doesn't mean your boss wants to hear it. When you ask for a raise could be just as important as what you're asking for. It could be as simple as planning to chat before the work day is in full-force or when you know your boss is in a good mood. But there's more to timing than the obvious.

As per Lydia Franks, editorial and marketing director for PayScale as told to Business News Daily, "If your company has a regular performance review schedule, try to have a conversation about your compensation a couple months in advance so that your boss has time to make a case and advocate for budget ahead of that process." If you wait too long, there may be nothing the company can do about your request, even if they agree you indeed deserve a raise.

Plus, consider how the company is faring as a whole. As per Leslie G. Griffen, an HR consultant and career coach as told to Monster, "Asking for a raise while the company is in the middle of layoffs, for example, could send a signal that you're not tuned in to the business." That alone could be a red flag that you're not raise-worthy material.

Keep abreast of how well your company is meeting its quarterly goals and if things are positive, set a meeting with your boss at his or her convenience. Make sure you're clear as to what the conversation will be about so the timing is right for everyone involved.

Be Prepared

When you walk into your boss's office, come with a spiel that's well-rehearsed and carefully put together. If you don't appear confident in the content of what you're requesting or your delivery for that matter, distraction could get in the way of the end goal – a raise. Heck, if you don't think you deserve a raise, why should anybody else?

As per Business News Daily, carefully plan your approach. Think about how your boss best processes information. Have a good understanding as to what information will be the motivating factors in agreeing to give you a raise.

Kathleen McGinn, professor of business administration at Harvard Business School as posted on Harvard Business Review notes, "As in any type of negotiations, you should try to put yourself in the other person's shoes, and design your approach accordingly. You have to think about why your boss should even consider granting your request. By understanding your boss's interests and goals, and aligning those with your own case, you are more likely to get what you want."

Harvard Business Review also shares advice from Diana Faison, a partner with leadership development firm Flynn Heath Holt Leadership, "Rehearse out loud, practice it with someone else, record yourself, and play it back. Listen for weaknesses in your argument or signs that you aren't getting to the point quickly enough."

With this in mind, there's only so much prep work you can do before pumping yourself up and going for it. You don't want to spend all your time overthinking, just make sure you've got a solid plan. Like Your Office Coach says, "Rehearse your request, convince yourself that you're worth it, and take the plunge. The worst thing that can happen is that your boss says no. But most managers will not be surprised or offended by the request."

Know Your Value

Your past accomplishments and the ways you've helped the company meet its goals and make money are more than just part of the job. They make you an asset to the company that's worth keeping around, and that may mean by agreeing to a raise in salary. As per Monster, "If you're considered indispensable, you'll have a stronger case."

According to Hannah Morgan of Career Sherpa, "A great way to keep your current boss up to date is by sending him or her a weekly or monthly email update. State what you accomplished in objective, measurable terms. And always try to tie your achievements back to organizational goals or how those accomplishments benefit the bottom line."

Harvard Business Review adds, "First, and most important, are facts about your own unique contributions that bolster your case: money-saving efficiencies you implemented, results from a project you've just overseen, positive customer testimonials, or praise from higher ups."

Just because you know all the hard work you've done doesn't mean your boss is fully aware of everything. He or she is busy with lots of other things after all. Plus, when everything is presented as a whole, your case is more compelling and impressive.

In addition, be sure to know what others in the field are raking in and that your salary and raise request jive. As per Harvard Business Review, "You should also gather information about company- and industry-wide salaries so you can go in with a reasonable target figure in mind. Your professional network, HR department, and sites like PayScale and GlassDoor are all helpful resources for determining your worth in the marketplace."

With these tips in mind, asking for a raise will be easier than you may have anticipated. Be sure to keep yourself together and show your true investment in the company. Honesty and honor will get you to the next phase in your career!

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As the years go by, you'll likely need to make some large purchases here and there. Plan for these major life purchases by identifying them and saving early.

While it's possible to be frugal with many aspects of your lifestyle, there are certain events and possessions that will require you to spend a substantial amount of money. Thus, a wise course of action is to begin saving well ahead of time while thinking about your goals for the future. This way, you'll be able to maintain a stable financial state even when faced with those large expenses. The following are a few major life purchases that you should plan for.

A Wedding

Marriage is a joyous occasion that many people look forward to. However, a wedding can be quite expensive, often costing thousands of dollars. Your family and your future spouse's family will often contribute to covering this, but you should still prepare to spend a good deal of your own money on the ceremony. If you're in a serious relationship and are considering marriage, you should plan where the funds for the wedding will come from and take the necessary actions to accumulate them. It's also crucial to discuss financial matters with your partner, since your property will merge once you get married.

A New Car

Automobiles remain one of the top modes of transportation. As a result, you may want to purchase a new car at some point in your life. Although you may be fine with an old or used vehicle at present, you may one day be motivated by a desire to acquire something nice for yourself or by the practical needs that arise as you raise children. Whatever the case, obtaining a new car is a major life purchase that you should plan for.

In addition to setting aside funds to eventually put towards a vehicle, you should also aim to build you credit score. This is because your credit score will determine your available car loan options. The higher your credit score, the more you may be able to lower your interest rates on your car.

A House

Owning your own residential property is a worthy objective that you may hope to make a reality one day. Ideally, you should save about 20 percent of the total cost of a house before you buy it. This will allow you to make a larger down payment and thereafter face less interest on your mortgage.

As with acquiring a car, the mortgage options that you'll have can change based on how strong your credit score is. You'll want to increase your score as much as possible in the years leading up to buying a house so that you can get more favorable interest rates. In addition to contemplating down payments and mortgages, you must also remember that you'll need to deal with property taxes, insurance, maintenance and repair fees, and sometimes homeowners' association charges.

It's also necessary to hire a real estate agent to help you with the buying process. There are different types of real estate professionals. You should know how to distinguish between buyer's agents and seller's agents so that you can obtain favorable prices on homes as well.

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When you are newly hitched and learning how to combine your essential legal and financial information as well as your accounts, it can be confusing.

Many people live together before getting married and have begun the process of combining accounts and sharing responsibilities. However, some people wait to do this only after marriage, and others wait until they're married to live together. Whichever path you've chosen, it's still crucial to know a few tips to manage money together as newlyweds to determine where you should begin and how you can remain on the same page.

Discussing Money Motivations

As we begin to share money with our significant other, we soon find out what one person may rank as a priority regarding money and the other may not. As such, sitting down and discussing money motivations is important. Two people who cannot agree on how to handle money may cause serious issues. This should include:

  • How to deal with money following payday. Is a percentage put into savings? Is that the day to splurge on dinner, drinks, and more?
  • The frequency and size of payments made to debts. Some people like to pay minimums, whereas others pay in full or make double payments.
  • What do you each consider money well spent? Is it a new 70" 4K television? Is it an investment? Is it paying as much debt off as possible?
  • How do you go about consulting each other before making purchases over a certain amount?

Establishing Financial Goals

After you evaluate the motivations behind your money and how it should be spent, you'll need to spend time together hashing out financial goals. As newlyweds, there are certain things on your list that you're going to want to save for. How do you go about that? How much of each paycheck will you dedicate to a particular fund?

Some things in the future worth making a financial plan for include savings and paying down debts. This is the time to be honest about your current financial standing. If you're looking to buy a home, you'll want to assemble a first-time homeowner financial checklist to begin to develop topics of conversation. Some of the things to consider setting goals for are:

  • Student loans
  • Car loans
  • Future children
  • A house
  • Medical bills
  • Delinquencies on credit reports
  • Vacation and rainy-day funds
  • Emergency funds

Budgeting Together

The more honest and open you can be with each other about the money you have and now the debts you share, the better. Implementing plans for the best ways to have the things that you both desire while still taking care of existing demands is important. These can be uncomfortable things to talk about; however, these conversations are necessary.

Following these tips to manage money together as newlyweds will allow you to have a starting point for conversations that can be tough to start. The sooner you and your partner get on the same page with finances and the responsibilities that come with them, the easier the transition will be and the sooner you'll find success.

It's the dream: money you can count on to keep rolling in, even while you sleep.

Passive income isn't entirely passive, of course. You'll put in work up-front to get the profits rolling, so don't relax in your recliner just yet. But with so many potential sources of passive income available to you, picking one or several will mean that the day you can finally kick back will draw steadily closer.

Rental Properties

Real estate is a tried-and-true wealth builder for a simple reason: people will always need somewhere to live. Research the market in a growing community until you know a good deal when you see it. You can maximize rent by fixing up a deteriorating property or upgrading a mediocre one. The key is to hire a property manager to do all the day-to-day landlord duties for you—and you'll need a good one. Smart investors put their profits in another property and repeat the process until they have a diverse portfolio.

A YouTube Channel

You can start a blog if you're more comfortable hiding behind a computer, but consumers are more likely to prefer video content. Post a series of “how-to" videos to answer questions about whatever you're an expert in.

You can put up any content you want, but if you don't want to commit to regularly updating it, focus on “evergreen" topics that will draw clicks for eternity. Ads will create your income, especially if your channel grows in popularity. Better yet, sign up for affiliate marketing. If you recommend a product and provide a link to buy it, you'll get a small percentage of those transactions.

Auto Advertising

If you don't mind vinyl-wrapping your car with an ad for a company, you can get cash just driving around and running your errands. Make sure you contact a reputable company that doesn't ask for any money from you; if they're the real deal, they'll evaluate your car, your driving habits, your area, and more. Bonus: the brighter the ad, the easier it'll be to find your vehicle in the parking lot.

Digital Products

What's something that people will pay for but doesn't require shipping on your part? Finding that item is what can supplement your income indefinitely. Write an e-book, charge for your cross-stitching patterns, design prints that people can digitally download, invent an app, record a “masterclass," or whatever else you want. Every time someone new discovers it, the cash register rings. With a little more effort, this is a potential source of passive income for you that can continue to grow. Once you build up a customer base, they might want more products. The good part is that it's up to you whether you wish to give it to them.