How Can You Make Money as a YouTuber?

YouTube is one of the oldest and still most popular video sharing services. It is completely free to use, but YouTubers — the people who make videos regularly — can earn some income for their posts. How does this work? How can people be making money off of a completely free platform?


The main way is through ads. YouTube didn't always play an ad in front of almost every single video. But now, it's hard to watch any video on the website without having to skip or sit through an advertisement. These ads are provided through Google Adsense. YouTubers connect their channel to Adsense and select the videos they would like to monetize — this means play an ad in front of them.

Ads are how Google makes money on all corners of the internet, including YouTube. Depending on how many views a video gets, Google and the YouTuber get more money in return. Google gets 45 percent of the revenue for a video and the content creator gets the remaining 55 percent. YouTubers agree to this when they activate their Adsense account and connect it to YouTube.

That percentage might sound like a decent amount, but the actual profits are very small. In 2013, a video with about 500 views would only earn about $3.80. However, a video with a billion views would earn $7.8 million. So if YouTuber's channel has a decent amount of subscribers and regular viewers, they can earn somewhat decent compensation for their content. But unless they have followers in the thousands or millions, it can be hard to make YouTube a full-time job.

However, Adsense isn't the only way YouTubers can make money for their videos. Another avenue is sponsorships. This is usually a short-term partnership between a content creator and a company. Typically, the YouTuber will be asked to promote or review some kind of product in exchange for a lump sum of cash. The amount of money varies based on the subscriber base and the size of the company providing the sponsorship. Once again, the bigger your channel is, the more money you're likely to make from these deals. However, sponsorships — while not steady — can be a good way for YouTubers to earn more money. Google doesn't get a cut of the profits like with native ads.

While many people might think that professional or full-time YouTubers have an easy job, content creators actually put a lot of time and effort into their videos and into building their audience. It can take years to build a channel up from zero to thousands of subscribers. And the rewards for doing so (at least in terms of revenue) aren't really satisfactory until a YouTube channel has millions and millions of subscribers.

PayPath
Follow Us on

Artificial Intelligence is the way of the future, whether I want to admit it or not. Months ago, my friends raved about how ChatGPT saved their lives by writing crucial 10 page essays in 30 seconds or less. Tell Chat to do basically anything, and it will.

Keep readingShow less
Photo by Eliott Reyna on Unsplash
In the era of TikTok, financial advice is just a scroll away. Everywhere you look, creators are making content on everything from budgeting to cryptocurrency – many with no real authority on the subject. Some are propagating get-rich-quick schemes, but some really do have genuine advice to offer. So in a world where anyone can claim to be a finance guru, how do you discern actionable advice from risky recommendations?
Keep readingShow less

Triangle of Sadness Dating Scene

via Triangle of Sadness
People are simple. We all want the same things: a comfortable life, a little treat every once in a while, and someone to clutch when the apocalypse comes. The last one, most of all. But I’m praying for anyone dipping their toes in the dating pool right now. We’re over inundated with choice and everyone is constantly looking over their shoulder for something better. Meanwhile, with all these confusing dating rules and the constantly shifting world of dating etiquette, I’m just searching for someone to look at me and say: “Pookie, you look amazing today.” Is that too much to ask?
Keep readingShow less