With more and more people to moving to cities, urban populations are exploding. As a result, condominiums are rising in popularity. An awesome ownership opportunity, different from the traditional home ownership process. But is one better than the other? Which should you choose for your needs? There are significant advantages and disadvantages to both, and we'll discuss them hear.

house noun hous/

  1. 1. a building for human habitation, especially one that is lived in by a family or small group of people.

con·do·min·i·umˌkändəˈminēəm/noun

  1. 1. NORTH AMERICANa building or complex of buildings containing a number of individually owned apartments or houses.
    • 2. the joint control of a country's or territory's affairs by other countries.
    Many people are leaning towards condos these days because of the shift to urban living. Condos offer up many advantages. Such advantages are the freedom from maintenance of the property, while also still retaining a modicum of ownership. All the condo owners on a given complex participate on a board and make decisions about the complex and common areas amongst themselves. Many condominium complexes also offer resort like amenities such as swimming pools, exercise facilities, and even spas. Even small things like not having to sweep leaves and shovel snow make condo life advantageous.

    However many people opt to own homes for it's many advantages. Complete and total control over the land and property decisions, and more space for friends, family and storage. Many people complain that the maintenance fees for condos are exorbitant and way too expensive. Also owning a home provides far more privacy than condo lining, without having your neighbors in such close proximity.

    While you won't be hit with maintenance fees owning a home, you do assume financial responsibility for every little thing that occurs to your home. Consider it the penalties of total ownership, but some people love nothing more, and take great pride to up keeping and upgrading their homes.

    Millennials are officially outnumbering baby boomers, and are beginning to enter first time home buying age. With credit more accessible for now, and after years of intense new development, there is no shortage of homes, especially in America's second their cities.

    What do you think? Would you prefer living in a condominium or a house? Which advantages and disadvantages matter the most to you? It's is generally easier to finance a house, however, all things even, buying a condo is far cheaper. Condos offer closeness to shops, restaurants and other amenities associated with living in a urban center, whereas homes can offer privacy and space. Houses tend to be considered as a better investment, but condos do offer more flexibility. Let us know how you feel and share your response. Happy home buying!

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    I thought I had a pretty good handle on my finances out of school. I worked several jobs while attending university and had little to no problem managing my income. However, once I graduated, I realized how much more complicated personal accounting could really be.

    There were so many variables I needed to keep track of. Biweekly bills, monthly charges, and general necessities amounted to a heap of confusing numbers that were often impossible to decipher. The funniest part was that I was actually trying to do this by hand (I don't know what I was trying to prove to myself, either).

    After messing up for the 17th time, I decided to give Microsoft Excel a shot. I used Excel a bit in school and I knew all the big-wig finance people used it, so what could I possibly have to lose? The answer is about six hours of my precious time. Excel isn't much of an improvement over handwriting and it's still dependent on the user to manually input all of the information. It's like doing everything by hand with the slightest help, meaning that it still required a tremendous amount of time and concentration. Well that was all for nothing, I guess.

    It's sort of funny. I was certain that I could manage my personal finances with ease, when it's practically a full-time job. I was already stressed out enough with my first job and I knew I didn't have enough time to give my finances the attention it deserved.

    That's why I decided to try out a budgeting app. My best friend told me that he uses an app called Truebill to manage his finances. "What does it even mean to manage your finances?" I asked him. He told me that Truebill was the personal financial assistant I wished I could have. It could aggregate all of my account information into one place and give me specific insights and actions.

    I loved the idea of having full control over my finances, especially during a time of financial uncertainty, and I realized that Truebill would be the easiest way to accomplish this. The user interface is incredibly simple and intuitive, so it doesn't even feel like a finance app! Truebill offers a multitude of features, with their most popular being the ability to cancel subscriptions with the press of a button.

    Okay, I had no idea how many subscriptions I was still subscribed to. In fact, I wasn't even using a quarter of the subscription services I was signed up for. Subscription boxes, streaming services, my old gym, and even an old subscription to my favorite magazine--it was all there and I was livid. How could I let myself waste all of this money and how did I never catch this? Thank goodness for Truebill.

    Truebill also offers bill negotiations. There is a 40% fee based on how much you save and Truebill even claims that there is an 85% chance that they'll be able to lower your bill once a negotiation is requested. Why wouldn't I take them up on this? There was zero risk and I would only have to pay once my bill was lowered (which means that I would be saving money regardless).

    More standard features of Truebill include the ability to generate a credit report on-demand and even request a pay advance. I only used the pay advance feature once when I wanted to buy a gift for my mom, but didn't have enough cash in hand and Truebill automatically reimbursed itself when I got my next paycheck.

    The credit report is another fantastic feature and practically taught me what good credit meant. Truebill's credit report basically shows you which financial decisions have the most significant impact on your credit score and ways that you can improve your credit month-over-month. I've never had such control over my credit and it feels good.

    I'll be the first to admit that I was extremely naive coming out of school. I figured that as long as I was attentive, I could manage my finances with ease. We manage money to some extent throughout our entire lives, but once you're thrown out on your own, it's a completely different story. With Truebill, I've finally been able to take control over my finances and stay on top of all of my responsibilities.

    Update: Our friends at Truebill are extending a special offer to our readers! Follow this link to sign-up for Truebill.