In many work environments, extraverted people are often preferred. Employers are often looking for someone who is outgoing, comfortable with people, make snap decisions and isn't afraid to take on leadership roles. In fact, our society often prioritizes these traits over other more introverted ones. However, there are plenty of things that introverts can offer in the workplace. Here are a few reasons why you should consider introverts as assets to your business.


1. Introverts are more skilled at written communication

While introverted people often stay quiet, they have excellent written communication skills. They often find it easier to express their thoughts through the written word than orally. Because of this, they often have more experience in writing and editing. Introverts can compile clear memos and very thorough reports with little difficulty. And these written pieces will likely be easy to understand with very few grammatical errors in the first draft. Every business should care about having clean written copy on its website or in internal documents. Introverts can bring that to your office with their natural skill with the written word.

2. When introverts do speak, they mean every word

Introverts can hold a conversation, but words don't come as fluidly to them as extroverts. Introverts often need to gather their thoughts before speaking. This isn't necessarily a bad thing. Instead of sharing half-baked ideas or partially formed plans, introverts tend to wait until their idea is fully formed. They've often thought through all the various implications of and questions about their plan too. If you question an introvert on a topic they are well versed in, you'll often receive fully formed and thoughtful answers. Introverts take their time to mull over the finer details, which is an asset for pretty much any business.

3. Introverts often avoid or attempt to resolve conflict

Have a lot of office conflicts? You probably have quite a few extraverts. Putting more introverts into the mix can help mitigate and prevent office drama. Introverts are willing to defend their ideas under scrutiny, but avoid unnecessary conflicts with their peers. Some introverts despise conflict so much that they might even attempt to resolve issues between their co-workers. Having introverts at work for your business can add a dose of calm to the office atmosphere.

4. Introverts can be very effective leaders

Introverts aren't usually eager to take on leadership roles, but when they do, they often excel at them. In fact, a Harvard study showed that introverts can be even better leaders than extraverts, especially if they're managing proactive employees. Introverts are more likely to listen to and consider the concerns and ideas of people they work with. Introverts also are naturally more humble than extraverts. This means introverts are more likely to admit to a knowledge gap or a mistake, which can be crucial in a fast-paced work environment. It is definitely preferable to fix a mistake in the review process before anything gets published or distributed. This attribute is great for a leader, who can easily delegate tasks to someone who might be more knowledgable than they are in a specific area.

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