If you're an aspiringsomething, it can be hard to practice your true passion in life and maintain a 9-5 job at the same time. Therefore, odd jobs can be the perfect solution to keeping the lights on and chasing your dreams. Thanks to the Internet, a wealth of databases, apps, and services have arisen, helping job seekers find flexible, high-paying odd jobs. Being located in a major city is where the odd jobs pay the most, as professionals in the city are commonly stretched thin in life and willing to pay big bucks for someone to do the simplest of everyday tasks for them. We've compiled some of the top paying odd jobs to help you get creative.

Nanny:

If you enjoy the company of kids, nannying for a family can be a rewarding and flexible way to earn some serious cash. Supervising a child is serious, and the pay is commensurate to the level of responsibility. In New York City, it is easy to find nannying gigs that pay around $20. It's a simple gig: pick up the kids from school, take them out to a recreational activity, help them with their homework. The tricky bit: getting your foot in the door. Families can be reluctant to hire a nanny that does not have prior childcare experience, so you may have to score your first gig through a winning personality or a strong reference. Speak a second language? That can work in your favor, as families may be wanting to immerse their children in a new language or someone who shares their native tongue.

How to snag a job?

If you're in college check out your campus career site, as families often turn to those to find young, flexible nannies. Also, Craigslist and newspaper classifieds are also great places to check out.

Surveys:

There are a wealth of legitimate paid surveys to complete online. The pay on these surveys can go from $10-$500. It usually depends on how long they run, how in-depth the answers need to be, and whether they are a questionnaire or interview. Sounds simple. The catch? Oftentimes these surveys are looking for very specific focus group subjects, ex: white men under 35 who live in the northeast and shop at Old Navy. So passing the screening process is the only real hard part. There are a number of sites that are constantly running new surveys to check out:

Focus Pointe Global

Pinecone Center

Inbox Dollars

Dog Walker:

Dog walking can pay around $15-$20 an hour. Add in the fact that you can secure multiple dogs to walk at once, and you're looking at a pretty nice paycheck each week. It may be a simple job, but securing a gig is not. Sometimes dog owners require a lengthy application process, requiring potential walkers to provide up to 3 pet-related references.

Here are some walking services to check out:

Ruffcity.com

Swifto.com

Pawfessionals.com

Delivery:

Have the stamina to bike around town? Thanks to the rise of apps and websites offering high-scale delivery options, the pay and tips associated with delivery has gone up. Postmates, which delivers practically about anything to customers' front doors, is always hiring. Other high scale deliver providers like Goldbely and TryCaviar offer up high tips with their pricey dishes.

Laundry Care:

This service is definitely the easiest and most convenient on our list. Make money doing other's people laundry! With Laundry Care, you have the power to select your clients. You pick up their laundry, clean and dry it, and return it to them. The app allows for flexible hours. The only requirements are owning a car, washer and dryer, and completing a phone interview. The service is available in cities across the nation from Milwaukee to Memphis.

LaundryCare.com

So there you go! Now you have multiple options on how to make a nice buck on the side.

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Spring may be the most popular time to list, but people need to buy homes in every season. Follow some simple steps to get your home sold in the winter.

Sometimes there is no choice—a home needs to be sold in the winter.

Spring may be the most popular time to put your house on the market, but homes do sell in the colder months. With fewer houses available, your home may be someone's only choice when house hunting in your neighborhood. As your neighbors hold out until spring, you'll already be done and ready to shop for your next house!

Here are a few tips for selling a home in the winter to get you on the right track.

Keep Paths Safe and Landscaping Fresh

Landscaping is the last thing on a homeowner's mind in the winter. Everything was cut back in the fall and may now be covered in snow. Still, take a walk around the house and yard to check everything out. Branches may have fallen from heavy snow, leaving a mess in the yard. Keep everything neat and tidy.

The last thing you need is a potential buyer slipping on the ice-covered walk in front of your house. Buyers often consider those moments bad omens, and this can affect their decisions. Shovel, snow blow, spread salt—do whatever you have to do to keep the driveway and walking paths clear, and don't forget the porch and deck.

Make the Inside Warm and Cozy

In cold weather, buyers won't spend a lot of time examining a home's exterior. Instead, impress them with the inside by creating an atmosphere which causes them to want to move in.

When there's time, leave wintery types of snacks and drinks, such as hot cocoa and cookies, available on a table during showings. This gives your home a welcoming feel to buyers.

Light the fireplace (if you have one) for a lovely ambience and set your thermostat to a comfortable setting. A warm home in the winter is much more appealing than a chilly one.

Make Your Home Less Personal

Understandably, this can be a tough thought for homeowners. After all, you've spent years creating memories in your home. To buyers, though, they need to picture it as their own. Too much personality makes that difficult.

It's always important to stage your home in a way that makes it look clean, comfortable, and move-in ready. Don't feel offended by the idea of taking family pictures down and replacing them with generic décor. This will help your home sell faster by helping buyers envision their own things there.

Cleanliness and Maintenance

Clean, clean, and clean some more. Make appliances, counters, and floors shine. No matter how old your home is, it needs to feel like new to potential buyers. If you aren't into dusting, now is the time to try. Don't forget window coverings that might need washing.

Be prepared ahead of time for home inspections by taking care of maintenance now. HVAC systems, plumbing, and electrical should all be up to code and running smoothly.

Use these tips for selling a home in the winter, exercise patience during the slower months, and your home will sell before you know it.

Entering your 20s means you'll quickly need to learn how to navigate the world of personal finances, much of which you probably didn't learn in college or high school courses.

Without any previous lessons on finances, it can be challenging to know where to start. Follow this guide as we outline the financial decisions you'll need to make in your 20s.

Setting a Budget

The first step to being a fiscally responsible young adult is setting a budget. Your budget will determine many future financial decisions, from where you can live to what splurges you can make. Look at the expenses you currently owe every month and your projected income to determine how much you should be spending on bills, daily expenses, etc.

Tackling Debt

Getting rid of your debt as early as possible is a critical step for newly independent 20-year-olds. However, some may not be able to get rid of debt as soon as they hope. Once again, look at your budget, then decide if you'd like to put more toward tackling debt now or pay your loans as they come.

Getting Coverage

While you may be able to hold onto your parents' insurance until 26, you'll have to choose your own plans sooner or later. From health insurance to renter's and car insurance, you shouldn't skip an opportunity to cover yourself in the case of an accident. Find a provider and plan you're comfortable with, and get your coverage as soon as possible.

Saving for a Rainy Day

Navigating how to save is another critical financial decision you'll have to make in your 20s. Living paycheck to paycheck is not a sustainable course of action. Even putting a small portion of your wages into a savings account can make a big difference—especially if an emergency you didn't prepare for occurs.

Starting To Invest

Investing is a scary topic for young adults, but it's a great way to build wealth. Starting to invest as a young adult will set you up for success on your long-term financial plan. However, be sure to conduct research before jumping into the market to decide when, where, and how much you'd like to invest.

Your 20s are an optimal time to learn and grow. One area of life you'll undoubtedly learn a lot about is managing finances. Use this guide to help you get started on the path to becoming a fiscally responsible adult.

Tax deductions can be tricky to understand if you're new to the finance world.

One of the biggest sources of confusion is knowing what you can and can't deduct from your taxes. Deductions can be a massive financial boon for a lot of people, yet not everyone files for them correctly. This causes people to miss out on money that should be theirs. We'll go over some of the most common tax deductions that are overlooked, so you don't get shortchanged when Tax Day comes.

Charitable Contributions

When you start regularly giving to charity, even if the donations are small, you'll want to start getting itemized receipts for your donations. These receipts will help you write off these charitable contributions on your taxes. You can even write off supplies that you bought for use in a charitable cause or any miles you drove on your car while in service to a charity. Make those donations to the Purple Heart Pickup with an open heart, but make sure you get your deduction on top of that.

Student Loan Interest Payments

Student loans take up a significant amount of a lot of people's money. If you're one of these people, make sure that you get a deduction on the amount of interest you paid off in the last year. What's important to remember is that even if you aren't someone's dependent, you can write off the money someone else gave you to pay for said student loans. If someone else helped you pay off part of your loan, don't think that means you can't still get a deduction on that sum.

Child and Dependent Care Credit

If you have a reimbursement account through your job that pays for child or dependent care, you might be forgiven for forgetting about this particular tax credit. However, you can use these funds for a tax credit if you file for them correctly. This is hugely important because this is an opportunity to receive a full tax credit, not just a deduction. You're losing money you could be directly receiving if you don't file for this credit.

Jury Pay Given to Your Employer

A lesser-known tax deduction that often gets overlooked is the money you can deduct from jury pay you gave to your employer. It may not be the most exciting thing to come out of jury duty, especially after handing over any money you receive to your employer, but you do get to deduct however much money your employer made you hand over after you finished jury duty.

Credit for Saving

While this credit is more for people that are working part-time or for those that have a retired spouse, you can get a tax credit for contributing to a 401(k) or another retirement savings plan. This is also a great incentive for those that are just starting out in their careers and need another reason to start saving for the future.