Are you in the market for a new home? If so, congratulations! Buying a new home is a major milestone and takes lots of well-thought out planning, financing, and preparation from moving out of your current residence to moving in to a new one.

After research online, working with a realtor, and viewing homes in person, you may start to wonder how you'll know if a home is the right one for you. Waiting for that "ah ha!" moment may not come as obviously as you may have pictured, so you'll need to rely on some other factors to be confident the home in question is "the one."


If the four items below fall in line, you can feel assured that the home you're thinking about is the one for you. While nothing will be 100% perfect, if you get most of the way there with each piece, home sweet home is right around the corner.

You Picture Yourself Living There

When you first saw the exterior and then walked inside the home, could you see yourself and your family calling the place home? Could you envision family dinners in the kitchen and tucking your kids into bed at night? What about BBQs in the backyard and hanging family photos on the walls? If you get that gut feeling, it means something.

Realtor recommends asking yourself, "Is the house the right size for your needs, and does it have the right combination of bedrooms, bathrooms and other living areas? If the house has two stories, are you comfortable with the idea of walking up and down stairs every day? Is the design and architecture of the house too modern or too traditional to match your preferences in furniture and home furnishings?" Be sure all aspects make the grade so you'll be happy with the home as a whole.

As per Sound Money Matters, "Would you feel proud having people over to this home? Can you imagine yourself coming home to the house and feeling happy? Can you see how you'd arrange your furniture? Then it's your house."

If you've looked at a number of homes and this one keeps coming back as your favorite or you find yourself using this home as the standard the others must match, then this home is a standout. Snap it up before someone else has the chance to ring the bell.

It's In Your Price Range

Of course, no matter how much you may fall in love with a particular home, if you cannot afford it, then there's no sense in pining over it. Plus, there's more to cost than the price of the home itself. As Realtor notes, "Are you comfortable with the monthly payments? Is the down payment within your means? Will you have enough cash to pay transaction costs and moving expenses? If the house needs major repairs, remodeling or redecorating, can you save the necessary funds within a reasonable time period?"

If you can answer "yes" to all of these questions, then you're on your way. Pre-plan as to not get your hopes up after finding a home you adore when it's clearly out of your price range. Work with your realtor to only look at homes you can actually afford.

Additionally, consider your status in life. HomeFinder advises, "There's nothing wrong with settling for a more modest dwelling that satisfies your immediate needs, before taking the plunge and spending more for your permanent dream home. The average home buyer stays in his or her home for a little more than six years, so allow yourself a chance for transition when the time is right."

A perfect home may be the one that's perfect for now. Another home may be in the cards a little further down the road.

It's In Good Condition

Unless you paid a lot less for a home than you'd planned to and set aside funds for renovations, your best bet is to choose a house that's up to par as is. Sure, you may want to make some changes to suit your personal taste, but if the place is falling apart and needs major work, you may have a real headache on your hands that can take months, if not years to cure.

As per HomeFinder, "First time homebuyers tend to underestimate the time and money needed for large remodeling projects. Adding a new bathroom, den or even sleek lighting fixtures not only costs a lot of money but can take you a while to complete. If you don't have time to update an older home, look for new construction springing up around the city and suburbs."

And Realtor suggests considering, "Does the house need a new roof? Extensive upgrading of the electrical wiring? New plumbing? Is the home disaster-ready? Will you be able to meet the financial challenges and live with the mess and inconvenience while the home is being brought up to your expectations?"

If you find a home that seems to be a great value, but then you need to put in tons of work, the deal may not be worth the future money you'll need to spend and the time the updates will take. Be sure to consider these factors before making a move.

Location/Neighborhood is Right

You want to be happy with your home, but you won't be totally pleased if it's located someplace that's not appealing to you. Bob Vila asks, "Is the house close to the places that are most important to you? Scout out the nearest grocery store, gas station, school, and place of worship — not to mention learning how far the house is from your workplace."

HomeFinder reminds you to choose a home that reflects your needs and personality. "Your lifestyle and how your prospective home fits into it, should be the main consideration in your decision to buy a home. Many couples with young children now choose their home according to which school district it's located in to ensure a good education for their kids."

Additionally, your neighbors will make a difference in how you feel in your new town. "A surprising study by Harvard political scientist Robert Putnam found that the more you have in common with your neighbors, the more likely everyone is to feel a connection to the community," as per Bob Vila.

As much as you love your new home, you will be stepping outside every now and then after all!

Are you ready to make your move? Now you'll know whether or not the home you're thinking of buying is right for you. It's time to open the door to your future!

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The traditional American Dream may be on its deathbed, but that doesn't mean a core component of the vision can't survive. It simply takes a diverse perspective. People can still believe they can attain their own vision of success in society with hard work, knowledge, and risk-taking. Investing in today's American Dream may literally mean investing money in our modern economy, starting with our infrastructure.

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