CNBC

Whether you're bored or completely overwhelmed without enough resources, it may be time to leave your current position and seek out better opportunities. The Bureau of Labor Statistics finds that Americans are quitting their jobs at the highest rate since 2001. While it's normal to occasionally feel stuck or unsure of your next step, if those feelings persist and worsen then it's probably a sign you've outgrown your job. Economists, employers, and job recruiters share 5 common signs that it's time to change your work situations.

1.You're not being challenged

If your heart isn't in your work, then slogging through the daily grind isn't worth the pay. Maybe the company has changed from its original direction or your duties have been altered so that it's no longer the right fit. Take stock of the company's future and your place in it. If you can't see it aligning with your passions, then it's time to brush up on your skill and move on.

2. You're being under-utilized

You may find yourself bored and frustrated because you're being overlooked in the workplace. Whether you've been repeatedly passed over for a promotion or your bosses deny your requests, you shouldn't feel useless or ignored. Suzy Welch at CNBC describes the feeling, "You're stuck in the kind of job I call a 'velvet coffin' — comfortable, but deadly to your brain and spirit, not to mention your career."

3. You're not paid enough

Whether the company has downsized or your haven't received a raise in years, your compensation should be commensurate with your performance and skill levels. Similarly, if you've been asked to take on extra tasks but your pay doesn't reflect your increased workload, that's a sign that you're being underpaid. As always, consider the future and see if you have room to advance in your current position. If not, you should create an exit strategy.

4. Your health is affected

Stress can negatively affect your energy levels, your mood, and your physical health. Worse is the fact that high stress and anxiety can create a lethargy that harms your work performance. If your sick days are increasingly due to dread or fear, then your body is telling you that you need to find a healthier and more productive environment.

5. Offensive workplace behavior

Obviously, if your superiors or co-workers repeatedly exhibit negative, offensive, or inappropriate behavior, you have every right to look at other positions. While a company should provide protocols to report such behaviors to Human Resources, you may also want to consult an employment attorney who has your best interests at heart. Like putting your health first, you should protect your sense of security and safety.

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I thought I had a pretty good handle on my finances out of school. I worked several jobs while attending university and had little to no problem managing my income. However, once I graduated, I realized how much more complicated personal accounting could really be.

There were so many variables I needed to keep track of. Biweekly bills, monthly charges, and general necessities amounted to a heap of confusing numbers that were often impossible to decipher. The funniest part was that I was actually trying to do this by hand (I don't know what I was trying to prove to myself, either).

After messing up for the 17th time, I decided to give Microsoft Excel a shot. I used Excel a bit in school and I knew all the big-wig finance people used it, so what could I possibly have to lose? The answer is about six hours of my precious time. Excel isn't much of an improvement over handwriting and it's still dependent on the user to manually input all of the information. It's like doing everything by hand with the slightest help, meaning that it still required a tremendous amount of time and concentration. Well that was all for nothing, I guess.

It's sort of funny. I was certain that I could manage my personal finances with ease, when it's practically a full-time job. I was already stressed out enough with my first job and I knew I didn't have enough time to give my finances the attention it deserved.

That's why I decided to try out a budgeting app. My best friend told me that he uses an app called Truebill to manage his finances. "What does it even mean to manage your finances?" I asked him. He told me that Truebill was the personal financial assistant I wished I could have. It could aggregate all of my account information into one place and give me specific insights and actions.

I loved the idea of having full control over my finances, especially during a time of financial uncertainty, and I realized that Truebill would be the easiest way to accomplish this. The user interface is incredibly simple and intuitive, so it doesn't even feel like a finance app! Truebill offers a multitude of features, with their most popular being the ability to cancel subscriptions with the press of a button.

Okay, I had no idea how many subscriptions I was still subscribed to. In fact, I wasn't even using a quarter of the subscription services I was signed up for. Subscription boxes, streaming services, my old gym, and even an old subscription to my favorite magazine--it was all there and I was livid. How could I let myself waste all of this money and how did I never catch this? Thank goodness for Truebill.

Truebill also offers bill negotiations. There is a 40% fee based on how much you save and Truebill even claims that there is an 85% chance that they'll be able to lower your bill once a negotiation is requested. Why wouldn't I take them up on this? There was zero risk and I would only have to pay once my bill was lowered (which means that I would be saving money regardless).

More standard features of Truebill include the ability to generate a credit report on-demand and even request a pay advance. I only used the pay advance feature once when I wanted to buy a gift for my mom, but didn't have enough cash in hand and Truebill automatically reimbursed itself when I got my next paycheck.

The credit report is another fantastic feature and practically taught me what good credit meant. Truebill's credit report basically shows you which financial decisions have the most significant impact on your credit score and ways that you can improve your credit month-over-month. I've never had such control over my credit and it feels good.

I'll be the first to admit that I was extremely naive coming out of school. I figured that as long as I was attentive, I could manage my finances with ease. We manage money to some extent throughout our entire lives, but once you're thrown out on your own, it's a completely different story. With Truebill, I've finally been able to take control over my finances and stay on top of all of my responsibilities.

Update: Our friends at Truebill are extending a special offer to our readers! Follow this link to sign-up for Truebill.