Getty Images

During almost any discussion of legislation in Congress, the national debt will reliably be introduced into the debate. This topic is unavoidable when allocating federal funds for any reason, but especially during budget proceedings. Usually, Republicans voice their concerns over excessive national spending and the effect that it would have on the federal deficit. But what exactly is the national debt and should we be concerned about it?

Essentially, the federal deficit is the amount of debt the United States has — or the amount of money it owes to other entities. These include U.S. federal agencies, state and local governments, foreign governments, and investors. The total national debt as of February 2018 totals to over $20 trillion. Needless to say, this is the highest amount of debt the country has ever had.

Why is the federal deficit so large? The simplest explanation is that the government has spent many years and decades spending more money that it collects in revenue from taxes. But the federal government is very large and has many, many working parts. Contrary to popular belief, China does not own most of the national debt. That title actually belongs to the Social Security Trust Fund — where your retirement checks come from. In fact, about 30 percent of the national debt is owed to 230 federal agencies. Or the United States owes this money to itself. This situation is a result of shifting money around to different parts of the government through the purchase and sale of U.S. Treasury bonds.

The federal deficit matters because of its potential impact on the economy. With higher debt burdens, economic growth slows. This is a side effect of governmental actions typically taken to deal with the deficit. As interest rises, the government is likely to raise taxes or increase inflation to handle it. Both have a negative impact on investors' willingness to invest. A higher inflation rate will often result in a higher interest rate, which discourages borrowing. Additionally, high levels of public debt cause concerns over whether the debt could actually be repaid in the future. However, the United States has so far been reliable in paying its bills. In fact, part of the reason America is the country with the highest foreign debt is because U.S. Treasury bonds are seen as the safest investment safest investment. But running up the debt even more puts the country more at risk for not making good on its promises.

An increasing national debt seems to be bad for the national economy, yet fiscal policies do not seem to be changing to resolve the situation. The new tax law implemented in 2018 cuts taxes across the board, but most steeply for businesses and wealthier individuals. Lowering the tax base will further contribute to the national deficit as there will be less money to make interest payments. The pattern continues with the 2018 fiscal year budget proposal from President Trump, which totals to about $4.4 trillion. The proposed programs and spending would add almost $10 billion to the deficit this year and $7 trillion over the next 10 years. This budget size is about the same as the total 2017 fiscal year budget under Obama, but it is an unusual proposal coming from a Republican president. Conservatives have long worked to maintain an image as the party of fiscal responsibility. Increasing the deficit with a big budget like this one does not fit that image.

So, should you be concerned about the national debt? Over the long-term, everyone should be concerned. Slower growth will affect every aspect of the economy. A booming economy encourages investment, which then creates economic opportunities. Lowered incentive from investors can spell trouble. Slower growth can also lead to wage stagnation and fewer jobs being created. To keep the unemployment figure low, America will need more economic growth as more young people enter the workforce.

PayPath
Follow Us on

Between buying a new home and transporting yourself and your belongings to it, moving can be an expensive process. One often underrecognized cost of moving occurs before one's original house has even been sold, and that's staging the house. Homeowners often spend hundreds of dollars making a home appealing to potential buyers. To ease the financial burden of moving, here are several tips for staging your home on a budget.

Downsize Instead of Storing

The goal of staging a home is to create a blank canvas that potential buyers can imagine their own lives painted upon. To accomplish this, homeowners should depersonalize the home as much as possible, removing items that are specific to their family and eliminating clutter. This is where homeowners often incur their first costs as they rush to put as many older things in storage as possible.

To cut costs, focus on downsizing rather than storing items. Look for items that you can sell, donate, or give away. For remaining items, look for alternative places to store them, such as a friend or relative's house. This will also reduce the cost of moving your belongings when it is time to go to the new house.

DIY What You Can

There are times when homeowners should bring in a professional to manage home renovations and decorating, such as when a task requires specialized skills. These types of jobs, when done incorrectly, will incur even greater costs if attempted on your own. However, many of the home improvement tasks that go into staging a home are simple enough that the homeowner can DIY them, such as painting, installing a backsplash, or refinishing the deck. Doing these tasks yourself will save you a significant amount of money.

Don't Redo, Update

Homeowners are often eager to make their houses look as appealing to buyers as possible. However, recall that the point of staging is depersonalization, making a home presentable so buyers can mentally impose their own style onto it. When staging a home on a budget, focus less on completely transforming the space and more on making what is there look presentable. For instance, if you wanted to give your bedroom a facelift, trying to replace the furniture and flooring would be pointless unless it was damaged or unkempt. Simply organizing the space and replacing the bed's comforter would be sufficient.

Maximize Space

Another way to update the space without entirely redoing it is to rearrange it to maximize the space that is already there. For instance, pulling the furniture away from the walls will make a room appear bigger and allows more space for those touring the house. Using window trimmings that maximize natural light and incorporating wall mirrors can also make a room seem more spacious.

Raising a larger family than most means that your lifestyle is going to change. Costs will continue to multiply as your family grows larger. However, just because your family is large doesn't mean your quality of life needs to suffer. It just means you need to make a few adjustments to help things work smoother and more efficiently. We've compiled a couple of money-saving tips for larger families to help you get the most out of your dollars.

Always Buy in Bulk

The benefit of having a larger family is that things you buy in bulk rarely ever go to waste. Smaller families can benefit from buying in bulk, of course, but your large family will see the most use out of shopping in large quantities. You'll want to avoid going to smaller stores for necessities such as groceries and clothes, as these places generally have higher markups on their items.

Buy Wholesale Items Online

If you want to take buying in bulk to the next level, one of the best money-saving tips for large families is to buy online from wholesalers. Buying online comes with a number of benefits that you won't get when you go to a physical store:

  • You don't have to drag your kids to the store with you
  • You have a lower probability of making impulse purchases
  • You can search for exactly what you need
  • Wholesalers sell in very large quantities for a lower price per item

Never Throw Away Something Useful

When you have to buy things for multiple children, your costs to replace items will be much higher. That's why it's so important to keep everything you can. Clothing is a big part of this. Hand-me-downs can prevent you from needing to replace entire closets every year. Try to repair or upcycle any clothes that may have damage, as this is usually much cheaper than buying brand-new items.

Stick to a Budget

When you support a large family, expenses can sometimes get away from you. Proper budgeting helps to keep the extra purchases that add up to a minimum. Budgeting correctly can save you a lot of heartache in the long run. It's up to you how much control you want to take; you can make your budget weekly or monthly, depending on how tight a ship you need to run. What's important to remember is that making the budget is only the first step—sticking to it is where you'll really need to enact some willpower.

Spring may be the most popular time to list, but people need to buy homes in every season. Follow some simple steps to get your home sold in the winter.

Sometimes there is no choice—a home needs to be sold in the winter.

Spring may be the most popular time to put your house on the market, but homes do sell in the colder months. With fewer houses available, your home may be someone's only choice when house hunting in your neighborhood. As your neighbors hold out until spring, you'll already be done and ready to shop for your next house!

Here are a few tips for selling a home in the winter to get you on the right track.

Keep Paths Safe and Landscaping Fresh

Landscaping is the last thing on a homeowner's mind in the winter. Everything was cut back in the fall and may now be covered in snow. Still, take a walk around the house and yard to check everything out. Branches may have fallen from heavy snow, leaving a mess in the yard. Keep everything neat and tidy.

The last thing you need is a potential buyer slipping on the ice-covered walk in front of your house. Buyers often consider those moments bad omens, and this can affect their decisions. Shovel, snow blow, spread salt—do whatever you have to do to keep the driveway and walking paths clear, and don't forget the porch and deck.

Make the Inside Warm and Cozy

In cold weather, buyers won't spend a lot of time examining a home's exterior. Instead, impress them with the inside by creating an atmosphere which causes them to want to move in.

When there's time, leave wintery types of snacks and drinks, such as hot cocoa and cookies, available on a table during showings. This gives your home a welcoming feel to buyers.

Light the fireplace (if you have one) for a lovely ambience and set your thermostat to a comfortable setting. A warm home in the winter is much more appealing than a chilly one.

Make Your Home Less Personal

Understandably, this can be a tough thought for homeowners. After all, you've spent years creating memories in your home. To buyers, though, they need to picture it as their own. Too much personality makes that difficult.

It's always important to stage your home in a way that makes it look clean, comfortable, and move-in ready. Don't feel offended by the idea of taking family pictures down and replacing them with generic décor. This will help your home sell faster by helping buyers envision their own things there.

Cleanliness and Maintenance

Clean, clean, and clean some more. Make appliances, counters, and floors shine. No matter how old your home is, it needs to feel like new to potential buyers. If you aren't into dusting, now is the time to try. Don't forget window coverings that might need washing.

Be prepared ahead of time for home inspections by taking care of maintenance now. HVAC systems, plumbing, and electrical should all be up to code and running smoothly.

Use these tips for selling a home in the winter, exercise patience during the slower months, and your home will sell before you know it.