In perhaps the most startling presidential election in U.S. History, Donald Trump, once-underdog, once-reality man, we will now be calling president. After a perilous fight against Hillary Clinton, Trump supporters are ready for change. And they want it now.

Throughout his campaign, Trump been infamous for his strong opinions, the center of which revolves around the economy.

According to his campaign website, he plans to "create a dynamic economy that will create 25 million new jobs over the next decade," and "for each 1 percent in added GDP growth, the economy adds 1.2 million jobs." The wealth divide and unemployment in the country has been an issue that has fluctuated throughout our presidents.

When you think of economics, you're probably going to think of Reagan and "Reaganomics" during the 1980s. This concept practiced "supply-side economics," gave tax reliefs to the rich and enabled increased spending. This allowed for the stimulation of the economy and increased job opportunities.

So what will "Trumponomics" look like?

While it's not super specific how the economy is going to create 1.2 million jobs with every percent of GDP growth, the concept seems nice. The more our country produces, the more jobs there will be. Seems like simple enough math. He also plans to create a pro-growth tax plan and "America-first" trade policy.

Trump's concepts come from the statistics about low labor in the U.S. Low wages, low GDP growth, low recovery. Trump plans to kickstart the American economy by getting able-bodied people back into the workforce.

Can he deliver? Only time will tell. In the meantime, here's how to brush up on Trump's economic policy and more.

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