Whether it's for an important interview, a big meeting with the boss, a sales call, or a convention, looking professional when required (which should be always) is a key component to being a stellar employee (or at least looking like one). But not everyone is at a place in life when spending big bucks on designer duds is an option.

Looking the part, even on a budget, is expected and doable. You can fake it 'till you make it and look like a pro for pennies. OK, dollars is more like it, but certainly inexpensively enough that you won't need to put in overtime.

Consider these 4 ways to instantly look professional on a budget. Your confidence will spike, those around you will be impressed, and "dress for success" will be oozing from head-to-toe.

1. Behold the Briefcase

Please, do not clumsily and sloppily barge into your boss' office with a piled-high stack of papers, a cell phone in one hand, and a pen behind your ear. Not only will you look a mess but you will look like you're totally disorganized and frazzled.

Carry your belongings to work, meetings, seminars, and even lunch pow-pows in a sleek briefcase, attaché case, cross body bag, tote, or other sort of business-like bag or satchel. Pick a material and color that is neutral (browns, blacks, beiges, etc.) and try to keep the carry-all to a decent size… you're not moving in.

Steer clear from bright colors, bold prints, or logos from sports teams, and if it's broken, torn, or busting at the seams, it's time to invest in a new one. You can find these on sale at department stores and even bargain stores like Walmart or Target. No one will know how much you spent, they'll just know you spent time getting your important work docs and supplies stashed away professionally.

2. Suit Up

Not every profession requires a suit and tie or buttoned-up business-like attire, but whatever your field's dress code is, dress accordingly. If you are in a field where more formal business-wear is the status quo, you can invest in some nice clothing without going into debt.

As per Alison Gary, editor in chief of Wardrobe Oxygen, as told to Power Wallet, "I recommend a simple black suit; buy the best you can afford with the fewest memorable details. With the suit, a couple [of shirts or blouses] in solid colors will get you through all interviews and provide you with the core for a work wardrobe." This goes for men and women.

Gary suggests shopping at thrift stores, resale or consignment shops, and even EBay to find some excellent deals on what would otherwise be pricy wardrobe pieces. My Star Job adds, "Regardless of the cut and style of the clothing, if it's made from cheap fabric, it is noticeable. Therefore, avoid buying anything that has lint coming out easily, or anything that is too shiny. Generally speaking, the thicker and the more textured the fabric is, the more expensive the garment will look."

Be sure the fit is good and your clothing is workplace-appropriate, even in the most creative of fields. Never show up with stains, wrinkles, or tears and you'll be dressed to impress. And unless you leave the price tag on, no one will know how money-wise your shopping trip was.

3. Fend Off Trends

Fads in fashion come and go and not everyone's into fringe, feathers, or freaky fabrics in an office setting. Trends can be pricy and they are generally not considered professional when you're sticking out like a sore thumb at the Q3 overview meeting. Not to say you can't have your own style, but if professionalism is what you're aiming for, save money and side-eyed looks by forgoing trends.

As per Business Insider, "Fashion trends move in and out faster than you think — don't waste your money on a piece you might regret in a year. Instead, invest in classics and staple items for your wardrobe. A neutral-colored blazer with never go out of style, and neither will a simple dress or blouse."

If you're really seeking some experimentation in your wardrobe, stick to something that won't overwhelm your entire look and won't cost much, such as a modern tie or with some nice accessories.

4. Groom with Gusto

One of the best, least expensive, and most noticeable ways to look instantly professional is by keeping yourself clean, neat, and well-groomed. A stylish yet simple haircut, fresh makeup, a clean shave, well-kept clothing and shoes, and nicely manicured nails show that you've got high self-worth and a professional sense of a decent way to show up to work.

As My Star Job notes, "One of the easiest ways to look expensive is to practice good grooming! You can go au naturale if you are blessed with good skin and nice features. Otherwise, exercise good skin care regime or add on a little makeup. Never allow your fabric to bunch up by the sides or to tuck excess fabrics on the back of your pants. Make sure your shirts taper with your body. Excess materials make you appear frumpy and disheveled, and cheapen your overall look."

Keep a comb and lint brush in your desk drawer for emergency touch-ups and you're all set. Grooming is nearly cost-free yet makes a major impact on your presentation.

Look at you, all professional! Momma would be proud.

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Spring may be the most popular time to list, but people need to buy homes in every season. Follow some simple steps to get your home sold in the winter.

Sometimes there is no choice—a home needs to be sold in the winter.

Spring may be the most popular time to put your house on the market, but homes do sell in the colder months. With fewer houses available, your home may be someone's only choice when house hunting in your neighborhood. As your neighbors hold out until spring, you'll already be done and ready to shop for your next house!

Here are a few tips for selling a home in the winter to get you on the right track.

Keep Paths Safe and Landscaping Fresh

Landscaping is the last thing on a homeowner's mind in the winter. Everything was cut back in the fall and may now be covered in snow. Still, take a walk around the house and yard to check everything out. Branches may have fallen from heavy snow, leaving a mess in the yard. Keep everything neat and tidy.

The last thing you need is a potential buyer slipping on the ice-covered walk in front of your house. Buyers often consider those moments bad omens, and this can affect their decisions. Shovel, snow blow, spread salt—do whatever you have to do to keep the driveway and walking paths clear, and don't forget the porch and deck.

Make the Inside Warm and Cozy

In cold weather, buyers won't spend a lot of time examining a home's exterior. Instead, impress them with the inside by creating an atmosphere which causes them to want to move in.

When there's time, leave wintery types of snacks and drinks, such as hot cocoa and cookies, available on a table during showings. This gives your home a welcoming feel to buyers.

Light the fireplace (if you have one) for a lovely ambience and set your thermostat to a comfortable setting. A warm home in the winter is much more appealing than a chilly one.

Make Your Home Less Personal

Understandably, this can be a tough thought for homeowners. After all, you've spent years creating memories in your home. To buyers, though, they need to picture it as their own. Too much personality makes that difficult.

It's always important to stage your home in a way that makes it look clean, comfortable, and move-in ready. Don't feel offended by the idea of taking family pictures down and replacing them with generic décor. This will help your home sell faster by helping buyers envision their own things there.

Cleanliness and Maintenance

Clean, clean, and clean some more. Make appliances, counters, and floors shine. No matter how old your home is, it needs to feel like new to potential buyers. If you aren't into dusting, now is the time to try. Don't forget window coverings that might need washing.

Be prepared ahead of time for home inspections by taking care of maintenance now. HVAC systems, plumbing, and electrical should all be up to code and running smoothly.

Use these tips for selling a home in the winter, exercise patience during the slower months, and your home will sell before you know it.

Entering your 20s means you'll quickly need to learn how to navigate the world of personal finances, much of which you probably didn't learn in college or high school courses.

Without any previous lessons on finances, it can be challenging to know where to start. Follow this guide as we outline the financial decisions you'll need to make in your 20s.

Setting a Budget

The first step to being a fiscally responsible young adult is setting a budget. Your budget will determine many future financial decisions, from where you can live to what splurges you can make. Look at the expenses you currently owe every month and your projected income to determine how much you should be spending on bills, daily expenses, etc.

Tackling Debt

Getting rid of your debt as early as possible is a critical step for newly independent 20-year-olds. However, some may not be able to get rid of debt as soon as they hope. Once again, look at your budget, then decide if you'd like to put more toward tackling debt now or pay your loans as they come.

Getting Coverage

While you may be able to hold onto your parents' insurance until 26, you'll have to choose your own plans sooner or later. From health insurance to renter's and car insurance, you shouldn't skip an opportunity to cover yourself in the case of an accident. Find a provider and plan you're comfortable with, and get your coverage as soon as possible.

Saving for a Rainy Day

Navigating how to save is another critical financial decision you'll have to make in your 20s. Living paycheck to paycheck is not a sustainable course of action. Even putting a small portion of your wages into a savings account can make a big difference—especially if an emergency you didn't prepare for occurs.

Starting To Invest

Investing is a scary topic for young adults, but it's a great way to build wealth. Starting to invest as a young adult will set you up for success on your long-term financial plan. However, be sure to conduct research before jumping into the market to decide when, where, and how much you'd like to invest.

Your 20s are an optimal time to learn and grow. One area of life you'll undoubtedly learn a lot about is managing finances. Use this guide to help you get started on the path to becoming a fiscally responsible adult.

Tax deductions can be tricky to understand if you're new to the finance world.

One of the biggest sources of confusion is knowing what you can and can't deduct from your taxes. Deductions can be a massive financial boon for a lot of people, yet not everyone files for them correctly. This causes people to miss out on money that should be theirs. We'll go over some of the most common tax deductions that are overlooked, so you don't get shortchanged when Tax Day comes.

Charitable Contributions

When you start regularly giving to charity, even if the donations are small, you'll want to start getting itemized receipts for your donations. These receipts will help you write off these charitable contributions on your taxes. You can even write off supplies that you bought for use in a charitable cause or any miles you drove on your car while in service to a charity. Make those donations to the Purple Heart Pickup with an open heart, but make sure you get your deduction on top of that.

Student Loan Interest Payments

Student loans take up a significant amount of a lot of people's money. If you're one of these people, make sure that you get a deduction on the amount of interest you paid off in the last year. What's important to remember is that even if you aren't someone's dependent, you can write off the money someone else gave you to pay for said student loans. If someone else helped you pay off part of your loan, don't think that means you can't still get a deduction on that sum.

Child and Dependent Care Credit

If you have a reimbursement account through your job that pays for child or dependent care, you might be forgiven for forgetting about this particular tax credit. However, you can use these funds for a tax credit if you file for them correctly. This is hugely important because this is an opportunity to receive a full tax credit, not just a deduction. You're losing money you could be directly receiving if you don't file for this credit.

Jury Pay Given to Your Employer

A lesser-known tax deduction that often gets overlooked is the money you can deduct from jury pay you gave to your employer. It may not be the most exciting thing to come out of jury duty, especially after handing over any money you receive to your employer, but you do get to deduct however much money your employer made you hand over after you finished jury duty.

Credit for Saving

While this credit is more for people that are working part-time or for those that have a retired spouse, you can get a tax credit for contributing to a 401(k) or another retirement savings plan. This is also a great incentive for those that are just starting out in their careers and need another reason to start saving for the future.