7 websites that will teach you to code for free

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In an increasingly digital workplace, having at least some basic knowledge of coding can set you apart in a crowded field. You don't need to get a new degree or even attend classes to gain this skill. Learn how to build websites and apps through the internet for free.

1. CodeAcademy

CodeAcademy is one of the most popular websites to learn coding for free. With its interactive interface, you can learn several different types of code without having to pay a cent. However, you can unlock projects and quizzes with a pro membership. Courses cover HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, Python, and Ruby. More than 24 million people have already learned how to code with this website.

2. aGupieWare

AGupieWare offers a Bachelor's-level introduction to computer programming without the cost of tuition. They are an independent app developer that surveyed programs taught at leading U.S. institutions and created similar curriculum. The program is broken into 15 courses and gives students the ability to study Python, Swift for Apple apps, and Linux.

3. Code Avengers

Code Avengers provides interactive courses that will teach you how to build games, apps and websites with HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Python. Each course takes 12 hours to complete. The website also allows users to select a specialization track to tailor their education to their needs and curiosities. The first five lessons in each course are free forever. If you want to progress beyond that, you'll need to buy a subscription.

4. Khan Academy

Khan Academy is one of the original free online learning institutions. Their lessons will always be free — no matter what. With step-by-step video tutorials and guides, you can learn how to create webpages with HTML and CSS or how to program drawings, animations and games with JavaScript and ProcessingJS.

5. Free Code Camp

Free Code Camp offers free curriculum to students of all kinds. You can learn HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, DevTools, Databases, Node.js, Angular.js and Agile by networking. You join a community of professionals and students and work together to on your skills. This allows you to build apps for free. Additionally, your code can also help solve real-world problems. Non-profits have access to your code and can use it in their own projects.

6. Hack.pledge()

Once you've gained some experience, you can visit Hack.pledge(). This is a community for developers, which includes high-profile coders such as Bram Cohen — the inventor of BitTorrent. Here, you can ask questions and learn from real professionals to expand your knowledge beyond the basics.

7. Web Fundamentals

This Google project is full of tutorials and resources for experienced developers. It's open source, allowing developers to play around with different types of code. Once you have the basics down, you can visit this site for updates on new standards across the industry. This resource works best once you have some knowledge of coding. Otherwise, you'll probably be very lost and confused.

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