Most companies, particularly larger ones, have a human resources (HR) department, or at least one HR manager. HR is a vital department with a pivotal role for the employees and the company as a whole. But when to bring an issue to HR is a concern for employees at least once in their professional career.

As per Human Resources EDU, human resources managers "Are the overseers of the human resources department and insurers of the functions and tasks being carried out by the HR team. They are often seen as the link between an organization's management and its employees, as their work runs the gamut from providing consultation on strategic planning with top executives to recruiting, interviewing, and hiring new staff. Due to the supervisory nature of this position, human resource managers are called upon to handle employee-related services, regulatory compliance, and employee relations, among many other tasks."

That's why your HR manager is the best person to go to if ever you experience any of the issues listed below. The workplace should be a zone where everyone is treated with respect, equality, and fairness. HR is on your side. Be willing to speak to your HR manager when appropriate and necessary. It can make a major impact on your work life.

1. Harassment

There is never an acceptable reason anyone should be harassed in the workplace. Whether sexual in nature or otherwise, "joking around" or dead serious, a place of employment is the wrong place for harassing others. Not that harassment anywhere is acceptable, but at least at work, feel secure in knowing HR is there to protect you.

As per TalentZoo, "If you feel you are being harassed or bullied, you should talk to your human resources department. It doesn't matter whether the person doing the harassing is a client, customer, colleague, or boss. It's important to report it." U.S. News & World Report adds more specifically, " If you're being sexually harassed or harassed on the basis of your race, sex, religion, disability, national origin, age (if you're 40 or older) or other protected class, HR has a legal obligation to investigate and put a stop to it."

Not only can HR investigate and put an end to this inappropriate behavior, but your complaint will be on record with the company if the situation continues, worsens, happens to someone else, or needs to be proved to the boss or even in a court of law. Don't let any form of harassment fly under the radar. If not put to a halt, it will usually continue, making the workplace a volatile place to be.

2. Discrimination

No form of discrimination is tolerable in the workplace. It can lead to anything from awkwardness to tension to outright danger. U.S. News & World Report notes, "Federal law prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of these traits (race, sex, religion, disability or other protected class), and companies are obligated to take action when a report of such discrimination is made in good faith. This is a case in which HR is more likely to more likely to understand what the law requires and know how to proceed correctly than your boss might be."

And it doesn't necessarily have to be you who is being discriminated against in order for you to bring it to HR's attention. According to The Undercover Recruiter, "It is possible to bring prejudice to light even if you are not discriminated against personally. If you feel someone's been unfairly treated, whether because of sexuality, age, race or disability, you have the right to raise the issue with your company, even if you don't share the characteristic that's being discriminated against."

Discrimination against anyone makes for a disrupted and even unsafe workplace. We're all in this together, so if you see (or hear) something, say something.

3. Accommodations/Lifestyle Change


If you need to make a change in your current work situation, be it time off, new hours, an inquiry about maternity/paternity leave, new openings in the company, etc., HR is the place to discuss and plan accordingly. The Undercover Recruiter says, "They'll (HR) liaise with your boss and try to make your schedule work for everyone."

Additionally, HR is your friend when it comes to understanding your company's benefits packages, pension and retirement plans, job details, vacation and sick day accommodations, health coverage, etc. The HR manager is responsible to relay this information to you and work with you to make sure you're set up with all the necessary paperwork and explanations. Always keep abreast of new packages and programs being offered at your place of employment and of any updates or changes along the way. These "extras" can be as important as your job itself.

If you are not being treated properly, HR is there to make things right. For instance, as per Talent Zoo, "If you're a breast-feeding mother, your office needs to provide you with a private area to pump milk during the day. If you don't have access to this, you should take your concerns to the human resources office." HR will let you know what your rights are and will help enforce and protect them.

HR is there for you, to make your employment experience positive with protection and knowledge. As The Undercover Recruiter puts it, "One of the most important people you'll be meeting is your Human Resources manager, because their main aim is your welfare. It's important that HR exists to make sure you, and your colleagues, are happy at work."

If you have an issue, don't hesitate to reach out to HR. Your safety and workplace satisfaction are their concern for both you and the company as a whole.

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I thought I had a pretty good handle on my finances out of school. I worked several jobs while attending university and had little to no problem managing my income. However, once I graduated, I realized how much more complicated personal accounting could really be.

There were so many variables I needed to keep track of. Biweekly bills, monthly charges, and general necessities amounted to a heap of confusing numbers that were often impossible to decipher. The funniest part was that I was actually trying to do this by hand (I don't know what I was trying to prove to myself, either).

After messing up for the 17th time, I decided to give Microsoft Excel a shot. I used Excel a bit in school and I knew all the big-wig finance people used it, so what could I possibly have to lose? The answer is about six hours of my precious time. Excel isn't much of an improvement over handwriting and it's still dependent on the user to manually input all of the information. It's like doing everything by hand with the slightest help, meaning that it still required a tremendous amount of time and concentration. Well that was all for nothing, I guess.

It's sort of funny. I was certain that I could manage my personal finances with ease, when it's practically a full-time job. I was already stressed out enough with my first job and I knew I didn't have enough time to give my finances the attention it deserved.

That's why I decided to try out a budgeting app. My best friend told me that he uses an app called Truebill to manage his finances. "What does it even mean to manage your finances?" I asked him. He told me that Truebill was the personal financial assistant I wished I could have. It could aggregate all of my account information into one place and give me specific insights and actions.

I loved the idea of having full control over my finances, especially during a time of financial uncertainty, and I realized that Truebill would be the easiest way to accomplish this. The user interface is incredibly simple and intuitive, so it doesn't even feel like a finance app! Truebill offers a multitude of features, with their most popular being the ability to cancel subscriptions with the press of a button.

Okay, I had no idea how many subscriptions I was still subscribed to. In fact, I wasn't even using a quarter of the subscription services I was signed up for. Subscription boxes, streaming services, my old gym, and even an old subscription to my favorite magazine--it was all there and I was livid. How could I let myself waste all of this money and how did I never catch this? Thank goodness for Truebill.

Truebill also offers bill negotiations. There is a 40% fee based on how much you save and Truebill even claims that there is an 85% chance that they'll be able to lower your bill once a negotiation is requested. Why wouldn't I take them up on this? There was zero risk and I would only have to pay once my bill was lowered (which means that I would be saving money regardless).

More standard features of Truebill include the ability to generate a credit report on-demand and even request a pay advance. I only used the pay advance feature once when I wanted to buy a gift for my mom, but didn't have enough cash in hand and Truebill automatically reimbursed itself when I got my next paycheck.

The credit report is another fantastic feature and practically taught me what good credit meant. Truebill's credit report basically shows you which financial decisions have the most significant impact on your credit score and ways that you can improve your credit month-over-month. I've never had such control over my credit and it feels good.

I'll be the first to admit that I was extremely naive coming out of school. I figured that as long as I was attentive, I could manage my finances with ease. We manage money to some extent throughout our entire lives, but once you're thrown out on your own, it's a completely different story. With Truebill, I've finally been able to take control over my finances and stay on top of all of my responsibilities.

Update: Our friends at Truebill are extending a special offer to our readers! Follow this link to sign-up for Truebill.