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The time may come when it is time to move on. After you have exhausted all other options, quitting may be the only thing left for you to do. While you may have wished things turned out differently, making the choice to leave your job and pursue something new is nothing to be ashamed of. As in all areas of life, making decisions that empower you and bring you to new heights in your overall well-being and development are smart ones.

But before you call it quits, keep in mind the things you should never do. Even if you are leaving on what you consider to be bad terms, professionalism and poise are always key to a smooth and sophisticated exit.

Here are four things you should never do if you are planning to quit your job. You may be fed up or just "over it," but quit like a class act and you'll be a better person for it.

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Don't Lose Your Cool

You may be at your wit's end, but once you lose control and say something you regret, you'll want to bury your head in the sand. Stay level-headed and be as calm as you can, even if you are quitting at a time of great stress or frustration.

As per The Balance, "Don't tell your boss and co-workers off… even if they deserve it. It is not just about being the bigger person. You never know who will turn up in your life at some point in the future. You may have to work with one of these people again. Even coworkers who are your allies may be put off by your behavior and may form a negative opinion of you."

Take a deep breath and go into the situation with discipline and directness, but never cross that line and risk damage to your professional reputation.

Don't Badmouth or Complain About Your Boss

If you know you are planning to leave the company, keep all thoughts about your boss to yourself, whether that means during "water cooler" chit chat among co-workers or with a potential new employer. It does nothing to help your cause or credibility.

Similarly, do not badmouth the company as a whole either. It stinks of pettiness and lack of appreciation. Instead, The Motley Fool suggests, "Stay positive. Focus on the exciting opportunities you have and how much you will miss your colleagues. Even if employees make a practice of badmouthing the company over lunch or post-work drinks, don't participate."

Remember, you are quitting anyhow, so name-calling is nothing but juvenile and mean-spirited. The rules of kindergarten always hold up.

Don't Sever Ties

You have your valid reasons for leaving, but that does not mean that the relationships you have built and contacts you have collected must be tossed aside and forgotten. If you depart from the company in a classy and friendly manner, you can keep those connections solid as you move towards the next step on your career path.

As per Wishing Well Coaching, "Don't burn bridges. Your network is one of your most valuable career assets. Keep the relationships you have and build new ones in your new place of work. No matter how sure you are that you're never going back to where you are working now, don't do anything you'll regret."

Don't forget, "You may need the company for references," as The Motley Fool notes. Keep in touch.

Don't Give Zero Notice

As per Wishing Well Coaching, "Quitting a job without notice is a sure way to burn bridges with your manager and co-workers, who are all left to pick up the pieces after your departure."

Your employer deserves respect and a decent amount of time to process your decision to leave and find a replacement. Walking in to your boss's office and walking out for good immediately after is in poor taste, unless something truly horrendous has happened.

The Motley Fool suggests, "You should give proper notice -- two weeks in most fields, but more in a few others. During your notice period you should make every effort to tie up any loose ends. Think about what the next person in your job might need and leave a hand-off note containing the relevant info."

You may be eager to move onward and upward but doing the right thing will end your time with the company on a high note.

Quit the quality way. And good luck in your next position!

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I thought I had a pretty good handle on my finances out of school. I worked several jobs while attending university and had little to no problem managing my income. However, once I graduated, I realized how much more complicated personal accounting could really be.

There were so many variables I needed to keep track of. Biweekly bills, monthly charges, and general necessities amounted to a heap of confusing numbers that were often impossible to decipher. The funniest part was that I was actually trying to do this by hand (I don't know what I was trying to prove to myself, either).

After messing up for the 17th time, I decided to give Microsoft Excel a shot. I used Excel a bit in school and I knew all the big-wig finance people used it, so what could I possibly have to lose? The answer is about six hours of my precious time. Excel isn't much of an improvement over handwriting and it's still dependent on the user to manually input all of the information. It's like doing everything by hand with the slightest help, meaning that it still required a tremendous amount of time and concentration. Well that was all for nothing, I guess.

It's sort of funny. I was certain that I could manage my personal finances with ease, when it's practically a full-time job. I was already stressed out enough with my first job and I knew I didn't have enough time to give my finances the attention it deserved.

That's why I decided to try out a budgeting app. My best friend told me that he uses an app called Truebill to manage his finances. "What does it even mean to manage your finances?" I asked him. He told me that Truebill was the personal financial assistant I wished I could have. It could aggregate all of my account information into one place and give me specific insights and actions.

I loved the idea of having full control over my finances, especially during a time of financial uncertainty, and I realized that Truebill would be the easiest way to accomplish this. The user interface is incredibly simple and intuitive, so it doesn't even feel like a finance app! Truebill offers a multitude of features, with their most popular being the ability to cancel subscriptions with the press of a button.

Okay, I had no idea how many subscriptions I was still subscribed to. In fact, I wasn't even using a quarter of the subscription services I was signed up for. Subscription boxes, streaming services, my old gym, and even an old subscription to my favorite magazine--it was all there and I was livid. How could I let myself waste all of this money and how did I never catch this? Thank goodness for Truebill.

Truebill also offers bill negotiations. There is a 40% fee based on how much you save and Truebill even claims that there is an 85% chance that they'll be able to lower your bill once a negotiation is requested. Why wouldn't I take them up on this? There was zero risk and I would only have to pay once my bill was lowered (which means that I would be saving money regardless).

More standard features of Truebill include the ability to generate a credit report on-demand and even request a pay advance. I only used the pay advance feature once when I wanted to buy a gift for my mom, but didn't have enough cash in hand and Truebill automatically reimbursed itself when I got my next paycheck.

The credit report is another fantastic feature and practically taught me what good credit meant. Truebill's credit report basically shows you which financial decisions have the most significant impact on your credit score and ways that you can improve your credit month-over-month. I've never had such control over my credit and it feels good.

I'll be the first to admit that I was extremely naive coming out of school. I figured that as long as I was attentive, I could manage my finances with ease. We manage money to some extent throughout our entire lives, but once you're thrown out on your own, it's a completely different story. With Truebill, I've finally been able to take control over my finances and stay on top of all of my responsibilities.

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