Looking to move up in the world…or at least at work? If a promotion is on your radar, there are things you can do to get closer to making one a reality. If you believe you are deserving of a bump up – be it a higher salary, greater responsibility, a more prestigious job title, or increased job security, here are three surefire ways to increase the chances you won't get passed over for a well-deserved promotion. Your boss only wants the best, and you've got the goods to back it up!

Be Irreplaceable

There's only one YOU! laruno.com

Your position must be valuable and you need to do a great job at what you do. If any old "Joe Schmo" can come along and fill your shoes seamlessly, why would promoting you be beneficial? Stand out, show your worth, and be the one who cannot be swapped with someone similar. When you are irreplaceable, your employer will want to keep you around and give you credit for your special skills, leading to a promotion.

Monster recommends, "Be Indispensable. Whether it's inventing a new program that will save your firm money or becoming a client's go-to person, put your boss in a position where he can't afford to lose you."

One way to shine? LiveCareer says, "Create a powerful personal brand. What is it that you want people to conjure when they think of you? What is the experience you want them to have when they work with you? This is entirely within your control, so don't neglect it."

There is only one you, so prove you're #1.

Keep it Professional

Professionalism at its finest s3.amazonaws.com

As per CNBC, "According to best-selling author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch, to get ahead, you need to act professionally and come across as in control of your career."

Gossip, drama, and other types of non-professional/irresponsible behavior will keep you from getting further in your career. No matter the office environment or general atmosphere (even the most laid-back of settings), maintaining professionalism is always a good thing. Maturity and mindfulness is key to showing you are serious about your job and care about the well-being and success of the company.

As LiveCareer warns, "Nothing can derail someone's future with an organization faster than negative information — and being involved in gossip in any way is the fast path to the end of your career with your employer."

Career Builder suggests avoiding these "professional faux pas" at all costs:

  • Regularly arriving to work late or leaving early
  • Using vulgar language within the workplace
  • Taking an excessive amount of sick days

And as far as remaining drama-free? The Muse explains, "Especially in an office environment, we have to work closely with different personalities and in less-than-ideal situations. Unless there's a real problem (read: you feel unsafe or can't complete your work), keep complaints to yourself."

Go Above and Beyond

Be committed s3.amazonaws.com

Clocking in and clocking out will score you a paycheck, but a promotion? Not likely. You need to prove you're a go-getter who is looking for more, by doing more.

As per Chameleon Resumes, "One of the biggest mistakes executives make is thinking they can just do what's expected of them and still get a promotion. You may not realize it but this is actually a form of arrogance. No one gets a promotion for just doing their job."

CNBC's Welch shares, "If you want to show your boss you're ready for that next step, then you're not just going to do what's asked of you and what's expected of you. You're going to expand your job to help the company [and] help your team."

LiveCareer recommends, "An excellent promotion tip is to volunteer for additional projects or assignments. Asking for more work demonstrates your interest and desire to help your department and company succeed — and puts a spotlight on your value to the organization."

Is a promotion in the cards? If you know you deserve one, make it known. Prove you're serious, smart, and strong and success can be yours by way of promotion. Good luck!

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What do you do when financial hardship hits and you can't make your monthly mortgage payments? This is a question on many homeowner's minds as nearly 17.8 million Americans are reportedly unemployed during the coronavirus pandemic.

When homeowners face financial hardship, such as the loss of a job, they often look to obtain a forbearance agreement from their lender. A forbearance happens when your lender grants you a temporary pause or reduction in monthly payments on your mortgage. Forbearance is not the same as payment forgiveness, in that you still have to pay the entire amount back by an agreed-upon time.

Mortgage lending institutions differ on their mortgage relief policies and qualifications; however, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act were signed into law in late March of this year to protect government-backed mortgages.

Federally backed mortgages include:

  • Fannie Mae
  • Freddie Mac
  • The Federal Housing Administration (FHA)
  • The US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA)
  • The US Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Under the CARES Act, homeowners with a federally backed loan who either directly or indirectly suffer financial hardship due to coronavirus automatically qualify for mortgage forbearance.

Even if your mortgage is not secured by one of these agencies, you still can call and see if you qualify, as many lenders will still offer the option in order to avoid foreclosures.

Under the CARES act, homeowners can claim mortgage forbearance due to financial hardship from COVID-19 for up to 12 months without requiring any documentation or verification. During the forbearance period, mortgage lenders cannot charge late fees or penalties.

Additionally, as long as your mortgage is current at the time you claim forbearance, the lender is required to keep reporting your mortgage as paid current throughout the entire period.

At the end of the forbearance, the CARES act protects consumers from having to make a lump sum payment. Instead, you will be given a repayment plan from your provider. Since repayment options vary, it's important you ask your provider about all of your repayment options.

Possible Repayment Options:

You may be eligible for a loan modification at the end of your forbearance. With modification, the mortgage terms are changed in order to add payments that were missed during the forbearance onto the end of the loan, extending the term.

Another option that may work for some is a reduced payment option. This allows you to keep paying monthly payments at a reduced amount. The amount missed is usually added back into the monthly payments at the end of the forbearance.

For example:

Regular payment: $1000 per month

Reduced payment: $500 per month

Payment after forbearance period: $1500 (until caught up)

Balloon payments, or lump sum payments at the end of the forbearance, are prohibited under the CARES Act. However, mortgage lenders may require homeowners who are not protected under the CARES Act to make a balloon payment at the end, so again it is best to check first with your provider.

Mortgage forbearance should only be considered in true financial hardship. In other words, just because of the pandemic, you should not take a forbearance on your mortgage if you can still afford your payments. Likewise, if you are able to start making payments before the forbearance period is up, it's best to do so as soon as possible.

The Next Steps:

Before you get in touch with your mortgage servicer, save time by gathering as much documentation about the mortgage as you can. Also, be ready to list your income and monthly expenses. Due to an influx in calls, financial institutions are experiencing extremely long wait times right now, and having your information at the ready will help.

Have questions ready to ask. Here are some questions you should be asking:

  • What fees are associated with the forbearance?
  • What are all the repayment options available to you at the end of the forbearance?
  • Will you be charged interest during the forbearance period?

If your forbearance is approved, make sure to keep all documentation pertaining to it. Make sure to cancel any automatic payments to the mortgage during the forbearance period, and keep tabs on your credit report to make sure your lender doesn't report the loan as unpaid.


For more information on forbearance, contact your lender and discuss your options. If you need more assistance with understanding your options, you can contact a local agent for the housing counseling agency, or call their hotline at 1-800-569-4287.