4 Top Careers for Introverts from Technical to Creative

pixabay.com

Do you consider yourself to be an introvert? According to Introvert, Dear, "The definition of an introvert is someone who prefers calm, minimally stimulating environments." Seems perfectly acceptable, but oftentimes, introverts feel and are treated differently than the rest of the population. Not everyone is designed to be super-bubbly, overly social, or particularly outgoing, so why the stigma?


As per Introvert, Dear, "Studies point to 30 to 50 percent of the U.S. population being introverts. That's one out of every two or three people you know." 30 to 50 percent of the population makes up a large amount of the workforce, so let's give introverts the accolades they deserve.

"Introverts (or those of us with introverted tendencies) tend to recharge by spending time alone. They lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds," notes Fast Company. That's why choosing the right job can put your introverted personality to good use. Succeed in a role you are comfortable in as you put your personality traits to the task. Here are four careers well-suited for introverts.

Computer Programmer

unsplash.com

It takes dedication and drive as well as attention and ability to be a computer programmer. And the more high-tech our society becomes, the more need there will be for people like you to fill new positions. As per The Balance, "Programmers spend much of their day staring at screens as they create code that makes computers and computer applications function." Being comfortable and satisfied with many hours of solitary work will help you excel at computer programming.

Writer

unsplash.com

For creative types, writing is an amazing outlet for expression and entertainment. If you have a knack for putting pen to paper (or fingertips to keys), writing is a career choice that will be fulfilling and meaningful. According to Slice, "Sometimes creativity requires solitude, so whether it's a breaking news story or a new chapter, the opportunity to be alone with one's thoughts is imperative." Do note, as per The Balance, "Some jobs require (you) to interview sources. You will be relieved to know that these conversations can often take place via email or through other means that limit contact if you desire."

Social Media Manager

unsplash.com

Although "social" is part of the job title, being a social media manager generally requires little face-to-face contact or communication with co-workers or clients. According toSnagajob, "Social media managers are the voice of companies on social and digital media sites like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Four Square, Instagram, etc." It's a modern and multi-faceted job many millennials are after. As Slice notes, "As long as you're cool holding conversations and interacting with customers and followers on a strictly online basis, you'll do just fine."

Translator

unsplash.com

If you are bi- or multi-lingual, a career as a translator is personally rewarding and helpful to others. As described by Sokanu, "Translators typically work from home. They receive and submit their work electronically. The goal of a translator is to have people read the translation as if it were the original. To do that, the translator must be able to write sentences that flow as well as the original, while keeping ideas and facts from the original source accurate." Slice explains, "You can work on your own to transcribe written documents from one language to another."

As Personality Club points out, "An uninterrupted workflow or at least minimal distractions are where (introverts) thrive in the workforce. These four jobs are diverse and perfect for people like you. For more career ideas that pay well too, see Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities' list of jobs for introverts in four areas: the social introvert, the thinking introvert, the anxious introvert, and the inhibited introvert.

Don't forget, we are all unique, so you may fall into more than one category.

PayPath
Follow Us on
Photo by Arlington Research-Unsplash

You’re powering through your morning. You’re in the zone. Getting so much done. But then you get Slacked with an innocent question: “Gotta moment to discuss the Jefferson thing?”

Keep readingShow less

Ever since the pandemic popularized (or forced) virtual meetings and, countless companies adopted the hybrid work model or went completely virtual. And once the public health crisis was declared over, we remained confined to our desks in our kitchens and attics working from home.

Keep readingShow less

April 18 came and your taxes were not ready. So you filed a tax extension. Well, you should file an extension, if you haven't already. Form 4868 is one of easier tax forms to fill out and it will give you an extra six months to get your taxes together. Everyone is eligible for a tax extension. The extension gives you until October 17 to file your taxes, but keep in mind if you owe the IRS money; it is still due April 18. Once you've filed an extension, what happens next?

Keep readingShow less