We have a great piece here highlighting some books you can read to further your financial knowledge, but sometimes you don't have to be so studious to still learn a thing or more. So I did some digging and came up with 9 movies to get your fiduciary gears spinning with the quickness. With enough humor and drama to make your financial education feel a little less stuffy and jam packed with enough info to have you finessing and flexing in your next conversations, in no particular order here's 9 movies to get you pumped about money:


The Big Short

With a star studded cast this film follows the lives of a few smart guys who got hip to the impending financial disaster and decided to make a fortune by betting against the what everyone else thought was a sure thing. Based on a true story.

Glengarry Gary Ross

What happens when an New York City office full of real estate salesmen is given the news that all but the top two will be fired at the end of the week, but they all need their jobs, and some more desperately than others. "Always Be Closing" is a salesman's mantra garnered from Alec Baldwin's riveting performance.

Inside Job

2010

This critically acclaimed Matt Damon narrated documentary points out the key players and events that would the 2008 financial crisis and the onset of the Great Recession.

Capitalism a Love Story

2009

Filmmaker Michael Moore travels all around the country examining the effects of corporate greed and the ensuing global economic meltdown in this enticing and revealing documentary.

Enron: Smartest Guys in the Room

2005

This documentary pulls up the curtain and shows just how Enron rose and fell and reveals all of its underhanded dealings, corrupt practices, and illegal actions as they robbed from the poor and gave to the rich.

The Wolf of Wall Street

2013

A young Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his merry band of miscreants make millions by defrauding wealthy investors out of their fortunes, but the SEC and the FBI are looming to take them in and take it all away.

Boiler Room

2000

Giovani Ribisi, Vin Diesel, and Nia Long star in a film where you can enter the Boiler Room as an ambitious 20 something and become a millionaire overnight. This movie has it all - fast cars, mansions, luxury toys, all while trying to stay one step ahead of the law.

Wall Street

1987

Real life father and son Martin and Charlie Sheen play father and son in this definitive 80's classic. The younger Sheen plays Bud Fox, an ambitious stockbroker desperate to make it to the top. He falls under the guidance of his idol Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglass) and soon finds himself entangled in a web of greed, deceit, and underhanded tactics that end up threatening everything around him - including the livelihood of his father.

Catch Me If You Can

2002

Follow Frank Abagnale (Leonardo DiCaprio) elude FBI Agent Carl Hanratty as he becomes the master of disguise becomes the most successful bank forger/ robber in U.S. history in this Steven Spielberg masterpiece.

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I thought I had a pretty good handle on my finances out of school. I worked several jobs while attending university and had little to no problem managing my income. However, once I graduated, I realized how much more complicated personal accounting could really be.

There were so many variables I needed to keep track of. Biweekly bills, monthly charges, and general necessities amounted to a heap of confusing numbers that were often impossible to decipher. The funniest part was that I was actually trying to do this by hand (I don't know what I was trying to prove to myself, either).

After messing up for the 17th time, I decided to give Microsoft Excel a shot. I used Excel a bit in school and I knew all the big-wig finance people used it, so what could I possibly have to lose? The answer is about six hours of my precious time. Excel isn't much of an improvement over handwriting and it's still dependent on the user to manually input all of the information. It's like doing everything by hand with the slightest help, meaning that it still required a tremendous amount of time and concentration. Well that was all for nothing, I guess.

It's sort of funny. I was certain that I could manage my personal finances with ease, when it's practically a full-time job. I was already stressed out enough with my first job and I knew I didn't have enough time to give my finances the attention it deserved.

That's why I decided to try out a budgeting app. My best friend told me that he uses an app called Truebill to manage his finances. "What does it even mean to manage your finances?" I asked him. He told me that Truebill was the personal financial assistant I wished I could have. It could aggregate all of my account information into one place and give me specific insights and actions.

I loved the idea of having full control over my finances, especially during a time of financial uncertainty, and I realized that Truebill would be the easiest way to accomplish this. The user interface is incredibly simple and intuitive, so it doesn't even feel like a finance app! Truebill offers a multitude of features, with their most popular being the ability to cancel subscriptions with the press of a button.

Okay, I had no idea how many subscriptions I was still subscribed to. In fact, I wasn't even using a quarter of the subscription services I was signed up for. Subscription boxes, streaming services, my old gym, and even an old subscription to my favorite magazine--it was all there and I was livid. How could I let myself waste all of this money and how did I never catch this? Thank goodness for Truebill.

Truebill also offers bill negotiations. There is a 40% fee based on how much you save and Truebill even claims that there is an 85% chance that they'll be able to lower your bill once a negotiation is requested. Why wouldn't I take them up on this? There was zero risk and I would only have to pay once my bill was lowered (which means that I would be saving money regardless).

More standard features of Truebill include the ability to generate a credit report on-demand and even request a pay advance. I only used the pay advance feature once when I wanted to buy a gift for my mom, but didn't have enough cash in hand and Truebill automatically reimbursed itself when I got my next paycheck.

The credit report is another fantastic feature and practically taught me what good credit meant. Truebill's credit report basically shows you which financial decisions have the most significant impact on your credit score and ways that you can improve your credit month-over-month. I've never had such control over my credit and it feels good.

I'll be the first to admit that I was extremely naive coming out of school. I figured that as long as I was attentive, I could manage my finances with ease. We manage money to some extent throughout our entire lives, but once you're thrown out on your own, it's a completely different story. With Truebill, I've finally been able to take control over my finances and stay on top of all of my responsibilities.

Update: Our friends at Truebill are extending a special offer to our readers! Follow this link to sign-up for Truebill.