careers

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Do you consider yourself to be an introvert? According to Introvert, Dear, "The definition of an introvert is someone who prefers calm, minimally stimulating environments." Seems perfectly acceptable, but oftentimes, introverts feel and are treated differently than the rest of the population. Not everyone is designed to be super-bubbly, overly social, or particularly outgoing, so why the stigma?

As per Introvert, Dear, "Studies point to 30 to 50 percent of the U.S. population being introverts. That's one out of every two or three people you know." 30 to 50 percent of the population makes up a large amount of the workforce, so let's give introverts the accolades they deserve.

"Introverts (or those of us with introverted tendencies) tend to recharge by spending time alone. They lose energy from being around people for long periods of time, particularly large crowds," notes Fast Company. That's why choosing the right job can put your introverted personality to good use. Succeed in a role you are comfortable in as you put your personality traits to the task. Here are four careers well-suited for introverts.

Computer Programmer

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It takes dedication and drive as well as attention and ability to be a computer programmer. And the more high-tech our society becomes, the more need there will be for people like you to fill new positions. As per The Balance, "Programmers spend much of their day staring at screens as they create code that makes computers and computer applications function." Being comfortable and satisfied with many hours of solitary work will help you excel at computer programming.

Writer

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For creative types, writing is an amazing outlet for expression and entertainment. If you have a knack for putting pen to paper (or fingertips to keys), writing is a career choice that will be fulfilling and meaningful. According to Slice, "Sometimes creativity requires solitude, so whether it's a breaking news story or a new chapter, the opportunity to be alone with one's thoughts is imperative." Do note, as per The Balance, "Some jobs require (you) to interview sources. You will be relieved to know that these conversations can often take place via email or through other means that limit contact if you desire."

Social Media Manager

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Although "social" is part of the job title, being a social media manager generally requires little face-to-face contact or communication with co-workers or clients. According to Snagajob, "Social media managers are the voice of companies on social and digital media sites like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Four Square, Instagram, etc." It's a modern and multi-faceted job many millennials are after. As Slice notes, "As long as you're cool holding conversations and interacting with customers and followers on a strictly online basis, you'll do just fine."

Translator

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If you are bi- or multi-lingual, a career as a translator is personally rewarding and helpful to others. As described by Sokanu, "Translators typically work from home. They receive and submit their work electronically. The goal of a translator is to have people read the translation as if it were the original. To do that, the translator must be able to write sentences that flow as well as the original, while keeping ideas and facts from the original source accurate." Slice explains, "You can work on your own to transcribe written documents from one language to another."

As Personality Club points out, "An uninterrupted workflow or at least minimal distractions are where (introverts) thrive in the workforce. These four jobs are diverse and perfect for people like you. For more career ideas that pay well too, see Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities' list of jobs for introverts in four areas: the social introvert, the thinking introvert, the anxious introvert, and the inhibited introvert.



Don't forget, we are all unique, so you may fall into more than one category.

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The old adage of never mixing business and pleasure may be smart for some, but there are plenty of perks that come from working with friends. Whether you take a position where a friend is already employed, or you get close with co-workers over time and form bonds, these relationships can improve your work life tremendously.

Good friends (and good jobs) are hard to come by, so if you can kill two birds with one stone (so to speak), you are one of the lucky ones. As long as you keep things professional and know your boundaries, having a buddy in business is a blessing. Here are some reasons why.

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You'll Be More Productive

While some may think working with friends would cause people to goof off more readily, the opposite is true.

According to Coca-Cola Company, "Having a work bestie is one of the strongest predictors of productivity (as per a Gallup poll). Friendships lead to a level of engagement that differentiate highly productive workgroups from mediocre workgroups. There's much less wasted energy and interpersonal obstacles."

Friends want to see friends find success and doing it together is even more meaningful and motivating.

Your Job Satisfaction Will Increase

Finding a satisfactory work-life balance can be tough, so when you get to see people you care about all day long, you'll be happier all around.

As Cuallet puts it, "It is good to feel excitement about going to work, as you want to share a story or experience with your friend, this can make your work seem simpler or less boring, and can help each other in the tasks to be done in their workday."

Coca-Cola Company adds, "We will often put up with a less than desirable job role if we love the people we work with and will want out of a 'dream job' if we don't feel like the people we work with support or accept us."

Additionally, as per Executive Lifestyle, "(Friends) can help each other deal with the inevitable workplace ups and downs in a more measured and positive way."

You'll Have More Trust

If you can't trust your friends, who can you rely on? Working with people who have your best interest at heart makes you feel more secure and stable, allowing you to focus on the big picture.

According to Executive Lifestyle, "Having a genuine friend in the workplace makes individuals more engaged with the job, more productive and more willing to push the envelope, because they know someone has their back. It makes us feel safer to take risks and is really important for boosting confidence and when you're confident that can lead to all sorts of positive work outcomes."

Instant Teamwork

The practice of teamwork is important in nearly any workplace environment, but it can take time to develop that bond and flow. When friends are already part of the picture, teamwork is already built-in.

As Cuallet notes, "Having a friend or group of friends will help you feel part of the team, talk about your problems and successes, foster a positive environment, benefit you individually as well as the company, creating a network of happy employees."

As per Coca-Cola Company, a university study found that, "Friendships outperformed acquaintances on all tasks because they were committed to communicating better while working and gave continuous feedback. Plus, they gave more critical feedback."

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Friendships are workplace-friendly indeed. Pal-up and see progress!