Everyone has seen better financial days.

Thanks to COVID-19 there have been non-stop budget cuts and mass layoffs, and a lot of people are starting to feel the financial pressure. While full-time remote work is hard to find, there are plenty of fast, extra ways to make a buck. If you're strapped for cash, here are a few easy ways to make some money.


Online Surveys

One of the easiest ways to make some fast cash from home is by taking online surveys. Brands, research groups, politicians, almost anyone with a need for public opinion will likely have some type of quick survey online. Sure, it won't make you rich, but any extra pocket change in a financial crisis is nice.

Sell Stuff

Chances are you've had an urge to deep clean your apartment, but what should you do with all the extra clutter you wanna get rid of? Sell it, of course! From LetGo to eBay and Craigslist, there are plenty of ways to sell your stuff and make good money doing it. If the goods are quality, it's best to go for eBay. Their auctioning system means you have a better shot of walking away with more than you bargained for. No matter what you're trying to sell, chances are there's an app that can help.

Become a Neighborhood Dog Walker

With schools and daycares closed across the nation, chances are parents will do anything to get a break from their dogs nagging. Offer to walk your neighbor's dog for an affordable rate a few times a week, or maybe even walk a couple of pooches in the neighborhood. Spending some quality time with pets can help improve your mental health, and not to mention it's a safe way (as far as we know) to make a relatively decent income.

Sign up For Uber Eats, Instacart, or Door Dash

With people afraid to go to the supermarket, delivery services are in extremely high demand. It's easy to become a delivery driver, and given the current climate, you can probably make some okay money. Not to mention it's good karma, as even the cheapest meal delivery services can make someone's day a little bit easier.

Become a Freelancer

Thanks to the internet there are a ton of ways to do some remote freelance work. Regardless of your skillset, chances are there are plenty of people looking for someone like you. UpWork, VirtualVocations, and Fiverr are always updating their sites with new opportunities. If those sites don't offer anything for you, Craigslist and Facebook also offer freelance opportunities.

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I thought I had a pretty good handle on my finances out of school. I worked several jobs while attending university and had little to no problem managing my income. However, once I graduated, I realized how much more complicated personal accounting could really be.

There were so many variables I needed to keep track of. Biweekly bills, monthly charges, and general necessities amounted to a heap of confusing numbers that were often impossible to decipher. The funniest part was that I was actually trying to do this by hand (I don't know what I was trying to prove to myself, either).

After messing up for the 17th time, I decided to give Microsoft Excel a shot. I used Excel a bit in school and I knew all the big-wig finance people used it, so what could I possibly have to lose? The answer is about six hours of my precious time. Excel isn't much of an improvement over handwriting and it's still dependent on the user to manually input all of the information. It's like doing everything by hand with the slightest help, meaning that it still required a tremendous amount of time and concentration. Well that was all for nothing, I guess.

It's sort of funny. I was certain that I could manage my personal finances with ease, when it's practically a full-time job. I was already stressed out enough with my first job and I knew I didn't have enough time to give my finances the attention it deserved.

That's why I decided to try out a budgeting app. My best friend told me that he uses an app called Truebill to manage his finances. "What does it even mean to manage your finances?" I asked him. He told me that Truebill was the personal financial assistant I wished I could have. It could aggregate all of my account information into one place and give me specific insights and actions.

I loved the idea of having full control over my finances, especially during a time of financial uncertainty, and I realized that Truebill would be the easiest way to accomplish this. The user interface is incredibly simple and intuitive, so it doesn't even feel like a finance app! Truebill offers a multitude of features, with their most popular being the ability to cancel subscriptions with the press of a button.

Okay, I had no idea how many subscriptions I was still subscribed to. In fact, I wasn't even using a quarter of the subscription services I was signed up for. Subscription boxes, streaming services, my old gym, and even an old subscription to my favorite magazine--it was all there and I was livid. How could I let myself waste all of this money and how did I never catch this? Thank goodness for Truebill.

Truebill also offers bill negotiations. There is a 40% fee based on how much you save and Truebill even claims that there is an 85% chance that they'll be able to lower your bill once a negotiation is requested. Why wouldn't I take them up on this? There was zero risk and I would only have to pay once my bill was lowered (which means that I would be saving money regardless).

More standard features of Truebill include the ability to generate a credit report on-demand and even request a pay advance. I only used the pay advance feature once when I wanted to buy a gift for my mom, but didn't have enough cash in hand and Truebill automatically reimbursed itself when I got my next paycheck.

The credit report is another fantastic feature and practically taught me what good credit meant. Truebill's credit report basically shows you which financial decisions have the most significant impact on your credit score and ways that you can improve your credit month-over-month. I've never had such control over my credit and it feels good.

I'll be the first to admit that I was extremely naive coming out of school. I figured that as long as I was attentive, I could manage my finances with ease. We manage money to some extent throughout our entire lives, but once you're thrown out on your own, it's a completely different story. With Truebill, I've finally been able to take control over my finances and stay on top of all of my responsibilities.

Update: Our friends at Truebill are extending a special offer to our readers! Follow this link to sign-up for Truebill.