Ted

Ted Talks are a great way to kill some time if you only have a little time to spare. They are also incredibly informative, inspirational, and useful tools that can help you understand the world around you. Business leaders share their tips and tricks while analysts and experts can show you what makes a business thrive. Ted talks can also help enlighten you about your own role in business, how to ask for a raise, and find a job you're truly happy with. Here are some of the best business Ted Talks for you to explore!

Rocío Lorenzo

How diversity makes teams more innovative

Ted

Posted Oct 2017 Rated Informative, Inspiring

This answers the question once and for all, yes companies are more innovative when they have more diversity. Lorenzo presents data you need to see to understand how and why diversity gives companies a more competitive advantage. Lorenzo focuses on the importance of women having a place at the table, which is refreshing for many who have been excluded for so long. There is more creativity and therefore more corporate beneficial pros to welcoming in different kinds of employees.


Shawn Actor

The Happy Secret To Better Work

Ted

Posted May 2011 Rated Inspiring, Funny

The CEO of Good Think, a company that researches and teaches about positive psychology, brings us this fast paced funny talk about true happiness at work. Do we have to work hard to be happy or are we thinking about it all wrong? Actor argues that work shouldn't come before happiness because the best way to be productive at your job is to genuinely like it. Happiness inspires us to be productive!


Casey Brown

Know your worth, and then ask for it

Ted

Posted Apr 2017 Rated Inspiring, Persuasive

Brown helps you reshape your thinking to help you get a raise. The key is to think like your boss. They aren't paying you what you think you're worth, they are paying you what they think you're worth. So get them to change their mind. She shares stories and lessons that can help you communicate your value and get paid more accordingly.


David Burkus

Why you should know how much your coworkers get paid

Ted

Posted Sep 2016 Rated Informative, Persuasive

This video is as important as ever, as showcased by Catt Sadler leaving E! News after finding out her male co-host earned double her salary. Burkus challenges our cultural assumption that salaries should be kept secret because of beneficial the information could be. The only person who benefits from employees being kept in the dark is the people who don't want to properly pay them. Burkus shows how sharing salaries can benefit employees and society.


Martin Reeves

How to build a business that lasts 100 years

Ted

Posted Aug 2016 Rated Informative, Inspiring

This interesting ted talk takes a medical, biological, spin on business. Taking a comparative look between the human body and business Martin Reeves explains how you can take inspiration for the immune system to help expand your companies life span. Reeves presents statistics about what is shrinking those life spans and how you can apply six principles from your own body to build a more resilient business.


Scott Dinsmore

How to find work you love

Ted

Posted Sep 2015 Rated Inspiring, Persuasive

What makes your employees dedicated and productive members of the team? Well it helps if they like their job! Scott Dinsmore tells his personal story of leaving a job that made him miserable and his journey to finding the right job for you. His simple talk gets to the root of a lot of people's job search. You have to find out what matters to you and then start doing it! He'll tell you how.


Barry Schwartz

The way we think about work is broken

Ted

Posted Sep 2015 Rated Inspiring, Informative

Another fantastic talk about how to get employees to work harder simply because they like their jobs. There has to be incentives other than a paycheck that motivate people at work. Barry Schwartz presents his solution which is to change the way we think about work. Thinking of workers as individuals instead of cogs on the wheel of the machine is a good way to start.


Go get exploring and learn some new things with these fantastic Ted Talks!

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The Federal Reserve sets the guardrails for the federal funds rate, and through that helps control the money supply for the nation.

When you take out a loan for a car, charge something to your credit card, or get a personal line of credit, there is going to be an interest rate that applies to your loan.

A lot of different factors go into what you will be charged, including your own personal credit score. But even those with flawless credit still see a minimum charge that they can't get around. That all goes back to the Federal Funds Rate.

One thing consumers rarely realize is that all of our banks are lending money to each other every night. Banks are legally required to maintain a certain percentage of their deposits in non-interest-bearing accounts at the Federal Reserve to ensure they have enough money to cover any withdrawals that may unexpectedly come up. However, deposits can fluctuate and it's very common for some banks to exceed the requirement on certain days while some fall short. In cases like this, banks actually lend each other money to ensure they meet the minimum balance. It's a bit hard to imagine these multibillion-dollar financial institutions needing to borrow money to tide them over for a bit, but it happens every single night at the Federal Reserve. It's also a nice deal for those with balances above the reserve balance requirement to earn a bit of money with cash that would normally just be sitting there.

The Federal Reserve The Federal Reserve


The exact interest rate the banks will charge each other is a matter of negotiation between them, but the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) (the arm of the Federal Reserve that sets monetary policy) meets eight times a year to set a target rate. They evaluate a multitude of economic indicators including unemployment, inflation, and consumer confidence to decide the best rate to keep the country in business. The weighted average of all interest rates across these interbank loans is the effective federal funds rate.

This rate has a huge impact on the economy overall as well as your personal finances. The federal funds rate is essentially the cheapest money available to a bank and that feeds into all of the other loans they make. Banks will add a slight upcharge to the rate set by the Fed to determine what is the lowest interest that they will announce for their most creditworthy customers, also known as the prime rate. If you have a variable interest rate loan (very common with credit cards and some student loans), it's likely that the interest rate you pay is a set percentage on top of that prime rate that your lender is paying. That's why in times of low interest rates (it was set at 0% during the Great Recession), a lot of borrowers should go for fixed interest rate loans that won't increase. However, if the federal funds rate was relatively high (it went up to 20% in the early 1980's), a variable interest rate loan may be a better decision as you would be charged less interest should the rate drop without the need to refinance.

The federal funds rate also has a major impact on your investment portfolio. The stock market reacts very strongly to any changes in interest rates from the Federal Reserve, as a lower rate makes it cheaper for companies to borrow and reinvest while a higher rate may restrict capital and slow short-term growth. If you have a significant portion of your investments in equities, a small change in the federal funds rate can have a large impact on your net worth.

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