Ted

Ted Talks are a great way to kill some time if you only have a little time to spare. They are also incredibly informative, inspirational, and useful tools that can help you understand the world around you. Business leaders share their tips and tricks while analysts and experts can show you what makes a business thrive. Ted talks can also help enlighten you about your own role in business, how to ask for a raise, and find a job you're truly happy with. Here are some of the best business Ted Talks for you to explore!

Rocío Lorenzo

How diversity makes teams more innovative

Ted

Posted Oct 2017 Rated Informative, Inspiring

This answers the question once and for all, yes companies are more innovative when they have more diversity. Lorenzo presents data you need to see to understand how and why diversity gives companies a more competitive advantage. Lorenzo focuses on the importance of women having a place at the table, which is refreshing for many who have been excluded for so long. There is more creativity and therefore more corporate beneficial pros to welcoming in different kinds of employees.


Shawn Actor

The Happy Secret To Better Work

Ted

Posted May 2011 Rated Inspiring, Funny

The CEO of Good Think, a company that researches and teaches about positive psychology, brings us this fast paced funny talk about true happiness at work. Do we have to work hard to be happy or are we thinking about it all wrong? Actor argues that work shouldn't come before happiness because the best way to be productive at your job is to genuinely like it. Happiness inspires us to be productive!


Casey Brown

Know your worth, and then ask for it

Ted

Posted Apr 2017 Rated Inspiring, Persuasive

Brown helps you reshape your thinking to help you get a raise. The key is to think like your boss. They aren't paying you what you think you're worth, they are paying you what they think you're worth. So get them to change their mind. She shares stories and lessons that can help you communicate your value and get paid more accordingly.


David Burkus

Why you should know how much your coworkers get paid

Ted

Posted Sep 2016 Rated Informative, Persuasive

This video is as important as ever, as showcased by Catt Sadler leaving E! News after finding out her male co-host earned double her salary. Burkus challenges our cultural assumption that salaries should be kept secret because of beneficial the information could be. The only person who benefits from employees being kept in the dark is the people who don't want to properly pay them. Burkus shows how sharing salaries can benefit employees and society.


Martin Reeves

How to build a business that lasts 100 years

Ted

Posted Aug 2016 Rated Informative, Inspiring

This interesting ted talk takes a medical, biological, spin on business. Taking a comparative look between the human body and business Martin Reeves explains how you can take inspiration for the immune system to help expand your companies life span. Reeves presents statistics about what is shrinking those life spans and how you can apply six principles from your own body to build a more resilient business.


Scott Dinsmore

How to find work you love

Ted

Posted Sep 2015 Rated Inspiring, Persuasive

What makes your employees dedicated and productive members of the team? Well it helps if they like their job! Scott Dinsmore tells his personal story of leaving a job that made him miserable and his journey to finding the right job for you. His simple talk gets to the root of a lot of people's job search. You have to find out what matters to you and then start doing it! He'll tell you how.


Barry Schwartz

The way we think about work is broken

Ted

Posted Sep 2015 Rated Inspiring, Informative

Another fantastic talk about how to get employees to work harder simply because they like their jobs. There has to be incentives other than a paycheck that motivate people at work. Barry Schwartz presents his solution which is to change the way we think about work. Thinking of workers as individuals instead of cogs on the wheel of the machine is a good way to start.


Go get exploring and learn some new things with these fantastic Ted Talks!

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It's easy to forget that the presidency of the United States is a government job just like any other–in that it comes with a stipulated salary and benefits.

But regardless of their bombastic rhetoric or self-serious public image, politicians are like all other government employees. The president, vice president, and legislators earn an annual income from the government in exchange for their duties, which include: executing/circumventing the law, upholding/withholding the civil liberties of American citizens, and legislating/sabotaging how societal institutions meet the needs of citizens, from healthcare to education.

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What do you do when financial hardship hits and you can't make your monthly mortgage payments? This is a question on many homeowner's minds as nearly 17.8 million Americans are reportedly unemployed during the coronavirus pandemic.

When homeowners face financial hardship, such as the loss of a job, they often look to obtain a forbearance agreement from their lender. A forbearance happens when your lender grants you a temporary pause or reduction in monthly payments on your mortgage. Forbearance is not the same as payment forgiveness, in that you still have to pay the entire amount back by an agreed-upon time.

Mortgage lending institutions differ on their mortgage relief policies and qualifications; however, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act were signed into law in late March of this year to protect government-backed mortgages.

Federally backed mortgages include:

  • Fannie Mae
  • Freddie Mac
  • The Federal Housing Administration (FHA)
  • The US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA)
  • The US Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Under the CARES Act, homeowners with a federally backed loan who either directly or indirectly suffer financial hardship due to coronavirus automatically qualify for mortgage forbearance.

Even if your mortgage is not secured by one of these agencies, you still can call and see if you qualify, as many lenders will still offer the option in order to avoid foreclosures.

Under the CARES act, homeowners can claim mortgage forbearance due to financial hardship from COVID-19 for up to 12 months without requiring any documentation or verification. During the forbearance period, mortgage lenders cannot charge late fees or penalties.

Additionally, as long as your mortgage is current at the time you claim forbearance, the lender is required to keep reporting your mortgage as paid current throughout the entire period.

At the end of the forbearance, the CARES act protects consumers from having to make a lump sum payment. Instead, you will be given a repayment plan from your provider. Since repayment options vary, it's important you ask your provider about all of your repayment options.

Possible Repayment Options:

You may be eligible for a loan modification at the end of your forbearance. With modification, the mortgage terms are changed in order to add payments that were missed during the forbearance onto the end of the loan, extending the term.

Another option that may work for some is a reduced payment option. This allows you to keep paying monthly payments at a reduced amount. The amount missed is usually added back into the monthly payments at the end of the forbearance.

For example:

Regular payment: $1000 per month

Reduced payment: $500 per month

Payment after forbearance period: $1500 (until caught up)

Balloon payments, or lump sum payments at the end of the forbearance, are prohibited under the CARES Act. However, mortgage lenders may require homeowners who are not protected under the CARES Act to make a balloon payment at the end, so again it is best to check first with your provider.

Mortgage forbearance should only be considered in true financial hardship. In other words, just because of the pandemic, you should not take a forbearance on your mortgage if you can still afford your payments. Likewise, if you are able to start making payments before the forbearance period is up, it's best to do so as soon as possible.

The Next Steps:

Before you get in touch with your mortgage servicer, save time by gathering as much documentation about the mortgage as you can. Also, be ready to list your income and monthly expenses. Due to an influx in calls, financial institutions are experiencing extremely long wait times right now, and having your information at the ready will help.

Have questions ready to ask. Here are some questions you should be asking:

  • What fees are associated with the forbearance?
  • What are all the repayment options available to you at the end of the forbearance?
  • Will you be charged interest during the forbearance period?

If your forbearance is approved, make sure to keep all documentation pertaining to it. Make sure to cancel any automatic payments to the mortgage during the forbearance period, and keep tabs on your credit report to make sure your lender doesn't report the loan as unpaid.


For more information on forbearance, contact your lender and discuss your options. If you need more assistance with understanding your options, you can contact a local agent for the housing counseling agency, or call their hotline at 1-800-569-4287.